Summer Camp @ Institute for American Indian Studies 2019 Explore, Create & Discover!

Spend the summer of 2019 @ The Institute For American Indian Studies! Our camp programs offer an immersion into the natural world and culture of Connecticut’s Eastern Woodland Native American people through the exploration of our replicated 16th century Algonkian Village, our forests, three sisters garden, and museum. Experienced and professional educators provide young and curious minds with exciting programs that engage and educate.

The programming for the Institute for American Indian Studies Summer Camps have been created to inspire and engage children from ages 5-12 and 13 to 16 in explorations of the natural world and history of Connecticut’s first inhabitants on Monday – Friday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. with extended camp options available with pre-registration. Young people from ages 13 – 16 can apply to a counselor in training program. Interactive activities include traditional stories, crafts, team building activities, and games that bring history to life in age-appropriate contexts. Kids will explore hands-on exhibits in our museum as well as in our outdoor replicated 16th century outdoor Algonkian Village and Three Sisters Garden located on 15 unspoiled acres, go on hikes to Steep Rock and the Shepaug River, and visit our traditional herb and flower garden. The week specific programming includes a group project that allows campers to practice the skills that they have learned to create something to take home and share with their friends and family or to leave at the museum for future visitors to enjoy. Kids will make friends, enjoy the summer and learn about Native American culture.

Weekly camps with different themes run from July 8 -August 16, 2019. Kids that love archeology and wonder what tools archeologists use to discover the past will enjoy Digging Detectives: Archeology Week, July 8-12. If your children are interested in food, Eating with the Seasons: Foraging in the Forest from July 15-19 teaches children how Native Americans were able to thrive in the natural world using their knowledge of the forest and rivers. Crafty Creations week on July 22-26 is sure to inspire the budding artist in your child. In this program, kids will learn about crafts, music, arts, and storytelling from a variety of Native American cultures, past and present.

To experience the beautiful natural environment at The Institute as well as to sharpen outdoor survival skills, Get Out! Woodland Survival, July 29 – August 2 will teach children outdoor living skills from knot tying and navigation to the safe use of fire in an outdoor setting and much more. On August 5-9, Tech It Out! Not So Primitive Technology will uncover the mysteries of the past and show kids how Native Americans figured out creative ways to thrive in their environment. The creation of tools, the construction of shelter and how to find food in the natural world that surrounds them will be on this week’s agenda. The final program of the summer, Nature Nuts: Forest and River Ecology from August 12-16 teaches the valuable lesson that all living things are connected. This important life lesson will be taught through games, stories, crafts and more.

For complete registration information, visit http://www.iaismuseum.org. Pricing is $228 for members of The Institute for American Indian Studies and $285 for non-members; families with two or more children registered to get a family discount. Registration forms and a non-refundable deposit of $100 is due by May 17, 2019. The summer camp director is Gabriel Benjamin and he can be reached at gbenjamin@iaismuseum.org.

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