Traditional Pottery Workshop@ Institute for American Indian Studies Sept. 24. 25 & Oct. 1

Every culture has some form of pottery and has used clay for utilitarian and aesthetic purposes for centuries. The Eastern Woodland Indians have a long history of making pottery from natural clay dug from pond sides, riverbanks, and even ocean cliffs. On Saturday, September 24, Sunday, September 25, and Saturday, October 1 the Institute for American Indian Studies on 38 Curtis Road in Washington, Connecticut is holding a Traditional Pottery Workshop from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. on each of the three days resulting in the creation of a clay vessel. Paul Wegner, Assistant Director of the Institute, and Griffin Kalin, IAIS Educator, and Traditional Skills Expert will guide participants through the construction and pit firing process of their vessel.

Pottery found by archeologists can tell us much about how people lived long ago. The decorations on pottery are expressions of culture and individualism, history, and about ties between people. It gives us a glimpse at how they cooked, what they ate, how they moved around, and what they left behind. By documenting and noting the changing shapes of vessels and designs archeologists are able to determine changes in diet and circumstances. A fascinating aspect of this workshop is learning about the different types of Native American pottery found throughout the country with examples from the Institute’s vast collections.

This is a three-day workshop because working with locally sourced clay requires time for the clay to be processed correctly. When making traditional Native American pottery there are no kilns and no wheels used in the process. During this workshop, participants will learn the traditional methods of pottery making starting with locally foraged clay that will be screened to remove rocks and other debris and then put into water to allow the clay to settle. After the clay is fully prepared, participants will add their own temper, which can be almost anything from a crushed shell, or sand, to crushed-fired pottery, or plant material. The clay is tempered to help pottery withstand the shock of rapid temperature changes and flames. A highlight of the program is making the vessel by using the coil method and learning how to treat the surface and decorate it. When the clay is ready, the vessels will be fired outside in a shallow pit. After firing, which can reach temperatures of up to 1500 degrees, the clay will be as hard as a rock. It is important to remember that the clay is fragile and that there is no guarantee that the vessels will remain intact during the firing process, which is part of the learning experience and fun.

This is an outdoor event so participants should dress for the weather and pack a lunch and some water. The cost of this intensive three-day workshop is $110 for non-members and $90 for members of the Institute. Pre-registration and pre-payment are required and refunds will not be given after September 24, without serious extenuating circumstances. For more information call us at 860-868-0518 or email us at events@iaismuseum.org. To register for this workshop click here.

Bocce Tourney in Norfolk – October 2

The bucolic village of Norfolk, Connecticut, famous for its Summer and Winter WIN (Weekend in Norfolk) is continuing the fun this fall with the 4th annual Bocce Tourny, on Sunday, October 2 behind the Station Place Cafe, 10 Station Place in the center of Norfolk. Folks will be gathering and teams will be formed starting at 3 p.m.and the tournament will start shortly thereafter. To add to the fun, there will be a warm-up session before this friendly competition begins, so make sure that you come early to secure your practice throws!

Regardless if you join in the competition or are a spectator, this ancient game is fun to watch. The first known documentation of bocce dates to a wall painting in an Egyptian tomb with two boys playing in 5200 BC. The game spread throughout the ancient world to Asia Minor, Greece, and Rome. It was played just about everywhere from temples to grand estates by young and old alike, as well as by men and women thanks to its ease and versatility. It remained popular throughout the centuries with Giuseppe Garibaldi, who, while unifying and nationalizing Italy, popularized the sport as we know it today. Bocce has been an Olympic Sport since 1896, when the first modern World Olympics were held in Athens, Greece.

At this popular Norfolk Connecticut event, there will be four people per team, if you come with less than four people, no worries, the organizers will pair you up with a team. If you don’t want to play, there is plenty of space to cheer contestants on while watching this ancient sporting competition in a quaint New England town against the backdrop of spectacular fall foliage. If you work up an appetite, there are plenty of restaurants within easy walking distance; as well as a taco food truck that adds to the fun. If you have questions or want to register, at no cost, email lboucher@norfolkmgmt.com…and, let the game begin!

😊

The 44th Norwalk Oyster Festival Fri., Sept. 09, Sat., Sept. 10, and Sun. Sept. 11 @ Veterans Park, Norwalk

One of New England’s favorite events, the Norwalk Oyster Festival presented by First County Bank is back in full swing in 2022. There is no better way to say goodbye to summer, than at the three-day festival-taking place from Friday, September 9th through Sunday, September 11th at Veterans Park, adjacent to Norwalk’s historic harbor. “Performances by nationally known musicians, incredible family entertainment, and “Kids Cove” activities are free with admission, making it fun for the whole family,” says Mike Reilly, President of the Norwalk Seaport Association, and Chairman of the Norwalk Oyster Festival. “For 15 years First County Bank has supported us, helping to make the Norwalk Oyster Festival a longtime Fairfield County tradition.” “As the official end of summer celebration, the Norwalk Oyster Festival is something that First County Bank and the Fairfield County community looks forward to year after year,” said Robert Granata Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of First County Bank.

For the Whole Family
There are so many ways for families to have fun this year. Nationally enjoyed professional entertainment will be taking place throughout the day at various locations on the festival grounds. If you are feeling lucky, head to the midway where you will find a variety of exciting games of chance. Don’t miss the mind-boggling act called Big Bee the Transforming Robot Car. Kids are thrilled to watch a regular car turn itself into a 15- foot action robot and, then get their photo taken with it! There is always something around the next corner that amazes and delights young and old alike. Here is a partial list of some of the acts you can catch, free of charge with the price of admission.

Ready Go Dog Show
This year the whole family will enjoy the Ready Go Dog Show that packs plenty of oohs and aahhs with its combination of comedy, family fun, and amazing high-flying canine athletes. The show consists of rescued dogs and features champion Frisbee dogs, thrill-seeking diving dogs, and the highest box jump dog in the world! A highlight for the audience is the chance to meet and greet the four-legged stars of this thrilling show after their riveting performance. The Ready Go Dog Show has been seen on the FOX game show, Game of Talents, ESPN, the Today Show and Friends, and many others!

Sheffield Island Circus
Pink cotton candy, the smell of popcorn, glittering costumes, and the astounding feats of daredevils make the Sheffield Island Circus something magical. Show favorites include clowns whose laugh-out-loud antics will have children rolling with non-stop laughter!

The circus fun doesn’t stop there. For thrill-seekers, there is the terrifying Globe of Death motorcycle performance that keeps spectators at the edge of their seats. The performers have been amazing audiences around the world, as two or more motorcycles run together in the large steel globe known as the “Globe of Death.” This energetic act is perfect for all ages because it always delivers the “wow” factor. Other acts include the performance of elegant aerial tricks from more than 20 feet up in the air and the colorful and fast-moving hula-hoop show.



Sunday is Family Day Plus Rides and Wristbands

Sunday, September 11th is Family Day all day when all kids get in Free with one paid adult admission. Carnival rides are one of the most exciting and thrilling things you can do at the Norwalk Oyster Festival. One of the best deals around on Saturday and Sunday is the specially priced wristband @ $30 each which is available for unlimited rides from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. for everyone.

The Music
The 2022 has live music from dozens of bands on multiple stages throughout the weekend and features a variety of crowd-pleasing entertainment.

On Friday night, September 9, the Norwalk Oyster Festival kicks off with Jana Kramer direct from Nashville. Kramer is an actress, an AMC award-winning country music singer, and a New York Times best-selling author. Known for her role as Alex Dupre in the television series One Tree Hill, she started her music career in 2012, seven of her singles charted on Hot Country Songs and Country Airplay, including the top 10 platinum-selling hits “Why Ya Wanna” and “I Got the Boy.” Kramer went on to win ‘New Female Vocalist of the Year at the 2012 Academy of Country Music Awards and, in 2015, she was nominated for ‘Best Female Vocalist of the Year at the ACMs.

To get Saturday night rocking, Alex Shillo takes the stage at 7:30 p.m. with his eclectic brand of rock and country music with a nod to his favorite, Bruce Springsteen. Shillo’s band is composed of top-notch musicians, that have performed with such artists as Clarence Clemons of Bruce Springsteen’s E Street Band, The Four Tops, The Temptations, Johnny Mathis, Gloria Gaynor, and John Cafferty, to name a few.

When Mike DelGuidice and Big Shot, take the stage on Saturday @ 8:30 p.m. the party really gets started. Mike DelGuidice, a multi-instrumentalist, dynamic vocalist, singer, songwriter, and recording artist is currently on tour with Rock N Roll Legend Billy Joel. Mike DelGuidice and his band, Big Shot is known nationwide for performing a show of astonishing renditions of Billy Joel’s songbook, in addition to songs by Elton John, Van Morrison, Paul McCartney, Marc Cohn, The Beatles, Led Zeppelin, The Eagles, John Denver, James Taylor, Chicago, and a few of Mike’s eclectic original songs, and much more. DelGuidice is a world-class vocalist and can sing just about anything. “We are delighted to bring this world-class entertainer and his band to the 44th annual Norwalk Oyster Festival,” said Mike Reilly, President of the Norwalk Seaport Association and Chairman of the Norwalk Oyster Festival.

This year on Sunday, September 11, the Norwalk Oyster Festival wraps up with the high-energy music of Get the Led Out, a band that has captured the essence of the recorded music of Led Zeppelin. Hailing from Philly, this band of six accomplished musicians brings Led Zeppelin to the Main Stage in all its mythic glory. Their two energy-driven heart pulsing set spans the career of the legendary “Zep” in all its depth and glory with the studio overdubs that Zeppelin themselves never performed live. Whether you like blues-soaked groove-driven rock anthems or more intimate acoustic sounds, by the end of the performance, you will understand why Get the Led Out has been hailed as “The American Led Zeppelin” nationally.



New This Year – Sheffield Island Laser Lightshow

New this year, the Sheffield Island Laser Lightshow promises to take you on a phantasmagorical journey. This 22- minute 3-D laser beam light show will be projected over the heads of the entire audience at the festival. The show is set to the music of Pink Floyd which is sure to carry the audience away with cutting-edge effects, high-powered lasers, and tons of smoke and haze effects. The show features bright colorful laser beams that sweep and move thru the sky at night along with animated artwork projected all over the stage. This professionally produced award-winning laser show will take place on Friday and Saturday night at the conclusion of the Main Stage entertainment to keep the party going just a little bit longer.

Arts and Crafts Galore
If you like to shop, head to the Arts and Crafts area where there’re more than 100 fine artists and crafters that display whimsical as well as practical items that appeal to all tastes, budgets, and ages. Jewelry, paintings, pottery, sculpture, clothing, home décor, and wearable art are just some of the treasures to be found here. At the Seaport Tent, learn about Norwalk’s oyster history, Sheffield Island Lighthouse, and browse specialty items on sale celebrating the island and lighthouse.

For the Foodies
Whether you are craving a salty or savory meal, a sugary treat to satisfy your sweet tooth, or an afternoon or evening snack, you’re guaranteed to find a favorite fair food at the Norwalk Oyster Festival and much more. After exploring the fairgrounds head to the International Food Court that dishes up everything from Mexican, Columbian, Greek, Jamaican, and Italian to funnel cakes, cotton candy, and, popcorn to name just a few goodies. New England favorites include fresh oysters shucked before your eyes, authentic New England lobster dinners, and fresh melt-in-your-mouth lobster rolls. Some of this culinary fare is prepared by dozens of local nonprofit organizations allowing them to raise funds for their charitable causes. And, if you work up a thirst there are plenty of choices from lemonade, fruit, and soft drinks to our popular craft beer tent offering more than forty beers.

Where
The Norwalk Oyster Festival is held at Veteran’s Park, adjacent to Norwalk Harbor on Seaview Avenue in Norwalk, CT.

Admission

This year pricing is Adults -$14, seniors – $10, Children – 5 to 12 years old $6 on Friday and Saturday, and Children under 5 are free. Sunday is Family Day and all children are free! To avoid the wait, tickets can be purchased online at http://www.seaport.org.

Hours: Friday, Sept. 9, from 6 p.m. to 11 p.m., Saturday, September 10, from 11 a.m. – 11 p.m., and Sunday, September 11 from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Parking & Shuttles
Free parking and shuttle buses are available at these locations:
9/10 – Norwalk Community College and Calf Pasture Beach 5:30– 11:30 p.m.
9/11 – Norwalk Community College and Calf Pasture Beach and Norwalk City Hall – 10:30 a.m. – 11:30 p.m.
9/12 – Norwalk Community College and Calf Pasture Beach and Norwalk City Hall – 10:30 a.m. – 11:30 p.m.

Fee Parking

Webster and Haviland Street parking lot, and the Maritime and Iron Works garage. All are within walking distance of the festival.

About First County Bank – Presenting Sponsor
First County Bank, headquartered in Stamford, Conn. for 170 years, is an independent mutual community bank with 16 branches in Stamford, Norwalk, Darien, Greenwich, Fairfield, New Canaan, and Westport offering deposit products, mortgages, wealth management, business banking services, and a full array of digital banking products including mobile and online banking. First County Bank has more than 220 employees, assets in excess of $1.7 billion, and is a winner of the Hearst Connecticut Top WorkPlaces 2020 award. For additional information, please visit www.firstcountybank.com.

About the Norwalk Seaport Association
The Norwalk Seaport Association was founded in 1978 as a non-profit organization dedicated to the preservation, education, and public awareness of Norwalk’s maritime environment and heritage. The Seaport Association and its volunteers are solely responsible for organizing and financing the Oyster Festival. In addition to the Oyster Festival, the Norwalk Seaport Association owns Sheffield Lighthouse; its volunteers maintain the lighthouse and grounds as a museum and nature preserve. For more information, visit http://www.seaport.org or call (203) 838-9444.

Weekend Workshops – Paper Dolls @ Wilton Historical Society

Paper dolls have been a common toy for centuries across the globe. Traditionally, in the United States and Europe, paper dolls have consisted of figures cut out of paper or thin card stock, with clothing fashioned out of paper held onto the dolls with paper folding tabs. Mass production of these dolls began in the early 1800s and continued into the 20th century.

On Saturday, September 10, from 11:00-12:00, the Wilton Historical Society will be offering a paper doll-making workshop for kids. The workshop will feature pre-cut paper figures which can be decorated with a variety of paper outfits, led by Museum Educator Catherine Lipper, who will also share her collection of three Madam Alexander dolls in pristine condition. The morning promises to be a great opportunity for creativity and fun!

According to the University of Chicago Library, early paper dolls created in Europe frequently depicted actors or actresses who were used similarly to puppet shows on toy stages. Dressmakers used articulated dolls for a more practical purpose – as miniature models for clothing designs. Wilton Historical holds several paper dolls in its collection including one from 1890.

This program is suggested for ages 6 – 10. Members are $10 per child, and Non-members are $15 per child. The Wilton Historical Society is located on 224 Danbury Road and is open Tuesday – Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Norwalk Seaport Association and Greens Ledge Lighthouse Preservation Society Offer Public Tours of Greens Ledge Lighthouse in September

Greens Ledge Lighthouse, on the Register of Historic Places, is one of 33 sparkplug lighthouses still in existence in the United States and remains an active aid to navigation. It is located just off the coastline of Norwalk close to Sheffield Island Lighthouse, owned by the Norwalk Seaport Association which is open for tours and special events.

The Norwalk Seaport Association in partnership with Greens Ledge Light Preservation Society is offering inaugural tours of Greens Ledge Lighthouse to the public on Saturday, September 17, and Sunday, September 18. These are the first public tours of Greens Ledge Lighthouse in more than 120 years. Tickets are available for $60 per person. To purchase tickets click here

Tours depart from the Sheffield Island Lighthouse Dock at 10 a.m. on Saturday and Sunday and return at 1 p.m. The dock is located at the corner of North Water Street and Washington Street in South Norwalk. Parking is available adjacent to the dock and at the Norwalk Maritime Center Garage. Visitors must wear sturdy close-toed shoes (no sandals or flip-flops) and anticipate walking up and down steep stairways. Children 10 and older are welcome to this cruise.

The major restoration work has been completed enabling the Society to launch a new program, the “Next 100 Years” of Greens Ledge Light.” The vision of the Greens Ledge Light Preservation Society is to transform Greens Ledge Lighthouse into a beacon of research, education, and sustainability, which will engage the local community. As the Society evolves they anticipate that programming will provide an additional avenue for fundraising and community engagement to help sustain their operating budget and minimize the need for capital campaigns for decades to come.

About Greens Ledge Lighthouse Renovation
Following a five-year, $2.5 million restoration – one of the most significant lighthouse restorations in recent history, Greens Ledge Lighthouse is now open to the public. The Greens Ledge Light Preservation Society – a 501(c) 3 nonprofit organization led by local Rowayton, Darien, and Norwalk residents, acquired the lighthouse from the Federal Government in 2016. The restoration of the lighthouse has been funded entirely by private donations and made possible by the support and volunteer efforts of many individuals and businesses throughout the community. For more information about the Greens Ledge Light Preservation Society www.savegreensledge.org

About the Seaport Association

The Seaport Association in Norwalk was founded in 1978 by a group of local citizens who had the vision to revitalize South Norwalk and preserve Norwalk’s maritime heritage. The Seaport Association offers a cultural, environmental, and historical journey to the Norwalk Islands. The Sheffield Island Lighthouse and the Light Keeper’s Cottage provide a unique historical and educational venue that strives to increase awareness, appreciation, and consideration for the environment and how the preservation of historic buildings contributes to our quality of life. The combination of the Lighthouse and the Stewart B. McKinney National Wildlife Refuge offers an unparalleled opportunity to educate children of all ages and adults about the importance of preserving Long Island Sound, our environment, and our maritime heritage.

Fall After School Programs@ Glebe House

If you are looking for a fun and educational after-school activity for your kids look no further than the Glebe House Historic House Museum and Jeykll Garden located on Hollow Road in Woodbury. Give your kids the opportunity to become part of living history at the Glebe House Museum & Gertrude Jekyll Garden – join the Marshall Children Young Docent Program. Here is your chance to really learn about what life was like for families who lived here in Connecticut during the Revolutionary War. You will learn to conduct guided tours of the museum in period costumes and will be taught candle making, quill writing, and other colonial crafts so that you might teach them to other children. You will be doing colonial cooking, visiting area museums, and having lots of fun immersed in the history of the historic house museum on the most historic street in Woodbury.

The Marshall Children Young Docent program is named for the nine children of John and Sarah Marshall who lived in the Glebe House from 1771-1786. These young docents are our greatest ambassadors in the community and participate in events like the Memorial Day Parade and the Woodbury Christmas Festival. All Hollow’s Eve, a wonderfully scary event now in its 21st year would not be the same without the inclusion of our young docents in the roles of some of Woodbury’s early citizens.

The program is open to children 6 & up and meets on select Thursday afternoons from 4:00 – 5:30. The upcoming Fall Session begins on Thursday, October 6th, and will include six meetings.
This is a wonderful opportunity to meet children from all over the region who share your interest in local history. You will become a significant part of the museum experience and enrich those who visit by sharing your enthusiasm and new-found knowledge.

*All CDC and State Health & Safety guidelines will be followed.

Please call the Museum Director for more information and to register at 203-263-2855. Information, registration forms, and scheduled dates are available on our website at www.glebehousemuseum.org.
The cost for the Fall Session is $125/Members and $150/Non-Members. There is limited space available. Registration will remain open until all spaces are filled.