Fall After School Programs@ Glebe House

If you are looking for a fun and educational after-school activity for your kids look no further than the Glebe House Historic House Museum and Jeykll Garden located on Hollow Road in Woodbury. Give your kids the opportunity to become part of living history at the Glebe House Museum & Gertrude Jekyll Garden – join the Marshall Children Young Docent Program. Here is your chance to really learn about what life was like for families who lived here in Connecticut during the Revolutionary War. You will learn to conduct guided tours of the museum in period costumes and will be taught candle making, quill writing, and other colonial crafts so that you might teach them to other children. You will be doing colonial cooking, visiting area museums, and having lots of fun immersed in the history of the historic house museum on the most historic street in Woodbury.

The Marshall Children Young Docent program is named for the nine children of John and Sarah Marshall who lived in the Glebe House from 1771-1786. These young docents are our greatest ambassadors in the community and participate in events like the Memorial Day Parade and the Woodbury Christmas Festival. All Hollow’s Eve, a wonderfully scary event now in its 21st year would not be the same without the inclusion of our young docents in the roles of some of Woodbury’s early citizens.

The program is open to children 6 & up and meets on select Thursday afternoons from 4:00 – 5:30. The upcoming Fall Session begins on Thursday, October 6th, and will include six meetings.
This is a wonderful opportunity to meet children from all over the region who share your interest in local history. You will become a significant part of the museum experience and enrich those who visit by sharing your enthusiasm and new-found knowledge.

*All CDC and State Health & Safety guidelines will be followed.

Please call the Museum Director for more information and to register at 203-263-2855. Information, registration forms, and scheduled dates are available on our website at www.glebehousemuseum.org.
The cost for the Fall Session is $125/Members and $150/Non-Members. There is limited space available. Registration will remain open until all spaces are filled.

Wigwam Construction @ Institute for American Indian Studies July 23

A Wigwam is a type of home created from tree bark. These structures are found throughout pre-contact New England. One of the few places where you can see a replica of 16th-century wigwams in the setting of a traditional Native American village is at the Institute for American Indian Studies on 38 Curtis Road in Washington, Connecticut.

On July 23, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. join Griffin Kalin, Educator at the Institute for American Indian Studies and Traditional Skills Expert for an interactive discussion and program about wigwam construction and the science and technology used to build them. This program will take place at the Institute’s 16th-century replicated Algonquian village that consists of several wigwams, a longhouse, a fire circle, drying racks, and the three sisters’ garden. Participants will learn what types of wood need to be harvested and the types of tools that would be used to build a wigwam. A highlight of this program is watching the actual repairs to the structures in the village to learn about this ancient process. Griffin is a wealth of knowledge and will be there to answer questions and give material demonstrations.

Pre-registration is appreciated and can be made by visiting www.iaismuseum.org to reserve a space through Eventbrite. If you have questions, call 860-868-0518 or email events@iaismuseum.org. This program is $5 per participant and free for members. This doesn’t include admission to the museum.

About The Institute for American Indian Studies
Located on 15 acres of woodland acres the Institute For American Indian Studies preserves and educates through archeology, research, exhibitions, and programs. They have a 16th c. Algonquian Village, Award-Winning Wigwam Escape, and a museum with temporary and permanent displays of authentic artifacts from prehistory to the present that allows visitors to foster a new understanding of the world and the history and culture of Native Americans. The Institute for American Indian Studies is located at 38 Curtis Road, Washington, CT.

Make it a Beach Party to Remember! Sheffield Island @ the Beach July 23, 2022 With the Norwalk Seaport Association

Kick off your sandals, sink your toes in the sand, and grab a cold drink, listen to the music and the sound of the waves because summer 2022 is here. And, what better way to celebrate than with the Norwalk Seaport Association, right on beautiful Calf Pasture Beach in Norwalk. On Saturday, July 23, the Norwalk Seaport Association is hosting an in-person seaside celebration, Sheffield Island @ The Beach from 6:30 p.m. to 10 p.m.

Culinary Delights, Signature Drinks, Music & More!

The Seaport Association has whipped up a recipe for a night to remember! The festivities include delectable specialties from the land and sea by Ripkas Beach Café’s, Chef Clyde, highly esteemed for his culinary creativity. A highlight of Sheffield Island @ the beach will be a Raw Bar of fresh, local clams and oysters that can be washed down with signature cocktails like the Seaport Swizzle, beer, wine, a selection of soft drinks, and infused water.

The culinary delights don’t stop there! For example, delicacies that may be included on the menu for seafood lovers could be mini crab cakes, fried oysters, conch fritters, and, other delights to name a few. Meat lovers aren’t left out and might enjoy mini Cubano bites, coconut curry chicken sate, mini beef kebobs, and more. Vegetarians can indulge at the cheese, crudités, and tapenade tables as well as at the wood-fired pizza station. Many more tantalizing goodies will be served at this amazing beach party that is not to be missed!

Friends, Sunsets, & Laughter all for a Good Cause

A beautiful sunset, seeing friends, S’mores on the beach, fire pits, and music add to the convivial ambiance of this seaside celebration. The tickets @ $125 per person are on sale now and are limited to 125 people. Tickets are available online at seaport.org or by calling the Seaport Office at 203-838-9444, so get them today so you don’t miss out on the fun. Proceeds from this event will be used in the maintenance of Sheffield Island Lighthouse, Connecticut’s Maritime Icon.

About the Seaport Association
The Seaport Association in Norwalk was founded in 1978 by a group of local citizens who had the vision to revitalize South Norwalk and preserve Norwalk’s maritime heritage. The Seaport Association offers a cultural, environmental, and historical journey to the Norwalk Islands. The Sheffield Island Lighthouse and the Light Keeper’s Cottage provide a unique historical and educational venue that strives to increase awareness, appreciation, and consideration for the environment and how the preservation of historic buildings contributes to our quality of life. The combination of the Lighthouse and the Stewart B. McKinney National Wildlife Refuge offers an unparalleled opportunity to educate children of all ages and adults about the importance of preserving Long Island Sound, our environment, and our maritime heritage.

An Ecology Walk Along the Shepaug River With the Institute for American Indian Studies

A summer walk along the Shepaug River that runs through Washington is a rewarding experience, especially when guided by IAIS Educator and Ecologist, Susan Scherf on Saturday, July 9 at 10 a.m. The cost of this program hosted by the Institute for American Indian Studies on 38 Curtis Road in Washington Connecticut is $10 for adults, $8 for seniors, $6 for children, and $5 for members. This hike is perfect for nature lovers and will have them looking at the natural world in a new and exciting way.

Fun on the Shepaug

The Shepaug River whose Native American name means “rocky waters” has a long history of habitation. Native Americans have lived overlooking this river for thousands of years. Many stone tools and items such as bone needles and punches, wooden spear shafts, tool handles, and much more have been found in archeological excavations along the banks of the Shepaug.

Rivers are considered the lifeline of ecosystems around the world. On this guided walk participants will learn that Native peoples traditionally recognized that all beings are interconnected. An important life lesson of this walk is to realize that we can learn about our environment by observing wildlife, plants, trees, and flowers. Summer is one of the best times to observe wildlife along the Shepaug from watching a great blue heron hunt to listening to frogs croaking, and feeling the exoskeleton of a crayfish. Walking along this babbling river Susan will discuss animal adaptations and explain what to look and listen for when trying to identify different species in the Eastern Woodland environment.

Participants should wear sturdy hiking or walking shoes, and be prepared to walk about a mile along the river with frequent stops along the way. Participants are encouraged to bring water and extra shoes or sandals to change into down by the river. Space on this hike is limited and pre-registration is required. To reserve your space visit http://www.iaismuseum.org to reserve a space through Eventbrite. If you have questions, call 860-868-0518 or email events@iaismuseum.org.

Learn How to Make Traditional Native American Bark Basket Workshop At Institute for American Indian Studies

Native Americans have created baskets for centuries. In fact, archeologists believe that basket-making is one of the oldest known crafts in the world. If you have always wanted to learn how to create a bark basket of your own, join this in-person workshop conducted by Jennifer Lee of Pequot and Narragansett ancestry on Sunday, June 5 at the Institute of American Indian Studies located on 38 Curtis Road in Washington, Connecticut. This four-hour workshop begins at 11 a.m. and has a break for lunch.

Join artist and educator Jennifer of Lee, Narragansett descent

About Native American Baskets

Baskets have been an integral part of Native American material culture for centuries. Native American baskets range from very simple to very elaborate. Often the art of basket making was passed down from generation to generation among Native American Indian mothers to their daughters. It is a skill that takes the place of pride among many Indigenous people today.

Bark baskets made by Eastern Woodland Indians were used for cooking, gathering berries, hauling water, storing food, as cradleboards, and even for burying the dead. Most often baskets were made from pine, ash, or birch bark that was harvested in the spring when the bark was most pliable. The bark was then folded into the desired shape and sewn with spruce root and rimmed with arrowwood or other natural materials.

White Pine Bark mokok with collar (4 ½H x 7W x 3D)

About the Workshop

Jennifer Lee is an 18th-century re-enactor and material culture presenter. Bark basket making is one of the programs that she offers. “I want my programs to dispel old stereotypes and increase awareness of present-day Native Americans,” says Lee.

Participants in this workshop will learn about the lore and tradition of basket making from Lee while creating their very own bark basket. A highlight is learning about how baskets were used in everyday life and their role in Native American communities today. Lee will guide participants through the process of creating a bark basket using white pine bark, spruce root, and willow. During the scheduled lunch break (please bring your own snack and non-alcoholic beverage) participants can wander through the museum for inspiration and brainstorm with others for ideas.

White Pine Bark mokok with collar (7H x 4W x 3D).

Participants can choose from three different basket designs that include a white pine bark wall pocket, and two sizes of a white pine bark mokok with collar. Whatever basket you choose to make, it is something unique to treasure at the end of the day.

Space is limited for this workshop that is expected to sell out, so sign up early. To participate, please register and pre-pay by June 2. The cost of participation, including all materials and tools, is $75 for members of the Institute and $85 for non-members. To register click here. If you have questions call (860) 868-0518 or email events@iaismuseum.org.

White Pine bark wall pocket, curved bottom (7H x 7W x 4D)

About the Institute for American Indian Studies

Located on 15 acres of woodland acres the Institute For American Indian Studies preserves and educates through archeology, research, exhibitions, and programs. They have a 16th c. Algonquian Village, Award-Winning Wigwam Escape, and a museum with temporary and permanent displays of authentic artifacts from prehistory to the present that allows visitors to foster a new understanding of the world and the history and culture of Native Americans. The Institute for American Indian Studies is located on 38 Curtis Road, Washington, CT.

Docktails & Oysters @ Norwalk’s Norm Bloom & Sons A Special Event Hosted by the Seaport Association

Who doesn’t enjoy hors d’ouves, cocktails, and oysters on the dock? It is a veritable summer tradition in Norwalk and one that the Seaport Association has embraced. Back by popular demand, Docktails & Oysters is the Seaport Association’s signature event on the dock at Norm Bloom and Son, a fourth-generation oyster farm in Norwalk. This seaside, fun-filled event for gourmands is taking place on Saturday, June 4, 2022, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.

This Luau-inspired party will get you in an “aloha state of mind” as you see folks in brightly colored Hawaiian shirts, listening to live beach music, sipping cocktails, and slurping the freshest oysters you will ever taste! “It’s a chance for folks to get to know what the Seaport Association does, have a little fun, and experience an authentic oyster farm,” said Mike Reilly, President of the Seaport Association.

If you have never had oysters, literally fresh off the boat this is an unforgettable opportunity to eat your fill of them – our advice is to come hungry! It’s fun to watch the pros shuck the oysters before your eyes (they make it look so easy) and set them on trays with lemons and an assortment of sauces. In addition to the unlimited clam and oyster bar, this Luau-themed event also offers passed and tabled appetizers such as citrus grilled shrimp, house-smoked pork sliders, and blackened swordfish tacos with pineapple salsa, vegetable spring rolls, and black bean and corn salad, in keeping with the island vibe.

An added bonus is the opportunity to explore the dock at Norm Bloom Oysters and Son, one of the few remaining traditional oyster farms in the United States to learn how oysters are grown and harvested. The oysters are incubated under the dock and, when they are big enough, they are “planted” on the sandy bottom of the Sound that surrounds you. The result of this time-consuming and meticulous process is some of the best oysters you will ever taste. Norwalk oysters are prized worldwide and known for their sweet briny flavor and plump meats.

Tickets to this event are limited and are $75 online and $85 @ the door. For more information and to get your tickets http://www.seaport.org, if you have questions, call 203-838-9444.

About the Norwalk Seaport Association

The Norwalk Seaport Association was founded in 1978 by a group of local citizens who had the vision to revitalize South Norwalk and preserve Norwalk’s maritime heritage. The Seaport Association offers a cultural, environmental, and historical journey to the Norwalk Islands. The Sheffield Island Lighthouse and the Light Keeper’s Cottage provide a unique historical and educational venue that strives to increase awareness, appreciation, and consideration for the environment and how the preservation of historic buildings contributes to our quality of life. The combination of the Lighthouse and the Stewart B. McKinney National Wildlife Refuge offers an unparalleled opportunity to educate children of all ages and adults about the importance of preserving Long Island Sound, our environment, and our maritime heritage.