Concerts at Keeler Tavern

The Louise McKeon Chamber Music Concerts will return to the Keeler Tavern Museum, (http://keelertavernmuseum.org) located at 132 Main Street in Ridgefield on Sunday April, 14th at 3 PM . The first concert of the season will feature Threeds, an oboe trio based in New York City. The trio includes oboists Kathy Halvorson, Katie Schele and Mark Snyder. Formed in 2008, the trio enjoys creating new paths for the oboe and English horn.

keeler tavern

The ensemble plays their own arrangements of pop, rock, jazz, folk and world music while using improvisational techniques. A special guest of Threeds at this concert will be Christof Knoche who plays the bass clarinet. Threeds has also arranged music to accompany local singer-song writers and has recorded at Avatar Studios and Daytone Records.

One of the founding principles of Threeds is to make the oboe an instrument more accessible to the general public by bringing their music out of the concert hall to bars, galleries and other public places that include sites from Joe’s Pub to the Cathedral of St. John the Divine. Recently, the trio was invited (by audition) to participate in MTA’s Music under NY where they will play in the New York subway.

Over the last few years Threeds have performed in Los Angeles, Providence, Philadelphia, Cape May as well as at the New York and Arizona Summer Music Festivals. The trio is composed of accomplished musicians that have performed with many prestigious orchestras, including Broadway Shows and Emmy nominated independent film tracks. In addition to the trio, the artists of the trio have taught at WestConn University, C. W. Post, Rudolph Steiner School, and the Brooklyn Conservatory among others.

Tickets at the door are $15 for adults, $12 for seniors and students, and $10 children under 12 years. Members of the audience are invited to enjoy conversation with the musicians following the concert. Light refreshments will be provided

The final performance of the 2012-2013 season on Sunday May 19th at 3 PM will feature the Devonshire Players, a string quarter.

For area information www.visitwesternct.com or www.litchfieldhills.com

Salisbury Jumpfest and Eastern U.S. Ski Jumping Championships Feb. 8 -10

Despite last week’s rain and 50 degree temperatures, there will be no shortage of snow at Satre Hill this weekend when the Salisbury Winter Sports Association (SWSA) hosts ski jumping for the 87th year during Jumpfest Weekend in Salisbury, CT, drawing some of the best junior jumpers in the East- many with Olympic aspirations.

Human_DR_Alpine2013,_David_Newman copy

SWSA president Ken Barker said “The night time temperatures dropped right after the warm spell and we’ve been making snow ever since.” Barker added “We have two snow guns that produce huge volumes of snow.”

With overnight temperatures remaining low this week SWSA directors will continue snowmaking to add extra cover to the landing hill.

photo credit Jonathan Doster
photo credit Jonathan Doster

“Our biggest problem,” Barker said “is that because there isn’t much snow on the ground out there, people may think that we don’t have any either. Right now, our ski jump facility looks like a big white patch in a otherwise brown world.”

The three-day Jumpfest will include Target-Jumping Under the Lights as well as the Human Dogsled Race, a crowd favorite where five humans pull one human on a sled around a .3 mile course. Teams get very creative with both their costumes and sleds.

photo credit: Jonathan Doster
photo credit: Jonathan Doster

Junior jumpers, many of whom have recently completed in the junior jump camp, will show off their new-found skills as they compete on the 20 and 30 meter hills.

Ice carving will return to the Scoville Memorial Library again this year, but with a new twist. In place of an actual competition, the event will feature multiple-block demonstration pieces by some the areas (and country’s) best carvers that will be sure to impress. To add to the fun, the areas best restaurants will compete in a chili cook-off. At night, Snow Ball revelers can dance to the rock and roll music of Common Folk and Treetop Blues featuring Joe Bouchard of Blue Oyster Cult fame.

Schedule of Events

Friday
Nite Lites

6:30 pm- Chili Cook-off
7 pm- Target-Jumping under the lights.
Following jumping- Human Dogsled Race

Saturday

9 am- Nordic Kids 20 and 30 meter competition
11am-noon- practice for Salisbury Invitational ski jumping competition
1pm-3pm- Salisbury Invitational Competition
11am-3pm- Ice Carving Demonstration featuring area’s best carvers, Scoville Memorial Library, free admission
8pm-midnight- Snow Ball, featuring opening band The Common Folk and treetop Blues with Joe Bouchard of Blue Oyster Cult fame, at the Lakeville Hose Co., admission: Adults $12, children 12 and under free.

Sunday

Pancake Breakfast at Salisbury Volunteer Ambulance building
11am- Practice 87th Annual Eastern Ski Jumping Championships
1pm- Competition including Junior Olympic hopefuls.

All jumping events held at Satre Hill in Salisbury.
Unless otherwise noted, admission for all events: $10 for adults and children 12 and under are free.

Proceeds from Jumpfest Weekend will fund SWSA’s children’s skiing programs.

For updates and program changes go to www.Jumpfest.org. For area information www.litchfieldhills.com

New Exhibits Open at the Silvermine Galleries

On Sunday, September 23 there will be an opening reception from 2pm to 4pm at the Silvermine Galleries located on 1037 Silvermine Rd. in New Canaan. This new exhibit will run from September 23 through November 3. The Gallery is open Wednesday – Saturday: 12p.m. – 5 pm; Sunday: 1 – 5 pm. For additional information visit www.silvermineart.org or www.visitfairfieldcountyct.com.

The art show will consist of four superlative artists and includes the work of

Camille Eskell: “Ezekiel Project”

“Dry Bones: Aurora” by New Canaan artist, Camille Eskell from her exhibit “The Ezekiel Project”

A new series of work reflecting the uncertainty, vulnerability and hope for restoring today’s cultural climate in 2- and 3-D media. The series title also alludes to the artists family name before it was Anglicized in the early 1900’s to better fit into American society. Close examination reveals hints of lace designs in her artwork, an emblem of a long-held family business.

“Creature Wood” by New York City artist, Mikhail Gubin from his exhibit “Splintery Configurations”

Mikhail Gubin: “Splintery Configurations”

The works in this new exhibit are all united by one idea, the use of recycled materials, and unified through the use of collage. The artist focuses the viewer’s attention on the issue of caring towards nature and to the earth’s dwindling resources and how it is manifested in our daily life.

“Untitled” by Easthampton, NY artist, Susan Halls from her exhibit “Head to Head”

Susan Halls: “Head to Head”

The scrutinizing ceramics faces fill the gallery with a continuous seam of small sculptures that penetrate the space and force the viewer to confront each piece as if they were looking at a criminal line up. The observer becomes the observed, the faces invite and repel, and hopefully, disturb. No one sculpture is larger than the hand, and the intimate sale draws the viewer in close.

Joan Wheeler: “Time Like a River”

This new exhibit of works consists of figurative, narrative oil paintings exploring mankind’s relationship with the natural world. The paintings reflect the cyclical seasons and interconnectedness of events over time. The title refers to the artist’s belief that events and relationships of today flow by us and become the past, while the events of the future inevitably flow towards us.