See Future Olympians @ Salisbury’s JumpFest Feb. 3-5

This year marks the 97th year of Salisbury Connecticut’s annual Ski Jump Competition called Jumpfest where spectators can watch some of the finest potential Olympic hopefuls compete on Satre Hill, at 80 Indian Cave Road in Salisbury, CT. Even if you have no snow where you live, the organizers of this event make it; so get ready to experience a winter wonderland that has a lot of action!

“If you have never seen ski jumping live, you have never really witnessed this sport,” said Willie Hallihan, Association Director of SWSA (Salisbury Winter Sports Assoc.) “The hint of frost in the air, the cacophony of ringing cowbells, spectators cheering on their favorites, and the slap of skis as they hit the landing hill, make this event unforgettable.”

Jumpfest offers three days of heart-pounding excitement and competitions to watch. The tower stands 70 feet atop Satre Hill and jumpers perch on their bar 350 feet above the ground. As the flag is dropped they speed their way down the 300-foot run, picking up speed along the way. Imagine watching as jumpers soar up to 200 feet through the air at speeds of 50 miles an hour! There are only six ski jumping venues on the East Coast and, Salisbury is among the oldest. Satre Hill is also one of the most respected jump venues because of past hopefuls that have competed in the Olympics.

Jumpfest kicks off on Friday, February 3 at 7 p.m. with target jumping under the lights. This is an exciting warm-up for the events on Saturday and Sunday and a great time to spot your favorites and cheer them on. Target jumping is followed by a crowd favorite, the Human Dog Sled Race where teams of six compete in this madcap event for a variety of prizes. There are only a half dozen places in the country that host this event and most of them are pretty far from Connecticut making this spectacle of fun something not to be missed! If you want to compete contact info@jumpfest.org, the cost is $25 per team with proceeds going to the mission of SWSA, youth skiing programs.

On Saturday, February 4, the day begins at 9:30 a.m. with the Junior Competition on the 20-meter and 30 meter hills. It is thrilling to watch these young athletes that have trained so hard tackle the hills.

The Salisbury Invitational Ski Jumping Competition begins at 11 a.m. with practice jumps followed by the competition that begins at 1 p.m. Jumpers come from far and wide making it exciting to watch them demonstrate their strength, skill, and conditioning that makes them fly effortlessly through the air. At the conclusion of the competition, medals are awarded on the hill. They are the next generation of jumpers to watch.

To end the day on a high note, spectators are invited to attend the “Snowball” taking place at the Lakeville Town Grove at 42 Ethan Allen Street from 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. There will be plenty of food and music by the Steve Dunn Band at this beautiful venue replete with a stone fireplace and chandeliers. Entry to the Snowball is $20 per person with children under 12 free.

On Sunday, February 5, the highly anticipated Eastern U.S. Ski Jumping Championships begins with practice jumps that run from 11 a.m. through noon. The long-awaited annual competition starts at 1 pm. At this event, there are often Olympic hopefuls competing. These expert jumpers seem fearless as they display the tremendous coordination, skill, balance, and strength that it takes to soar so far and so high in the air and, most importantly, to land smoothly. If you want to see some of the bravest athletes in sports just stand at the bottom of a ski jump and watch them soar. It is something that you will never forget because as most jumpers will tell you, it is the closest you get to flying…without wings or a parachute!

To add to the festivities there are food trucks, craft beer, hot toddies, and bonfires on all three days. Tickets are available at the gate and are $15 for adults on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday. Kids 12 and under are free all three days. Parking is free. The ski jump complex is located at Satre Hill on Indian Cave Road in Salisbury. Proceeds for Jumpfest fund the SWSA youth skiing programs. Before setting out check www.jumpfest.org for updates, scheduled changes, or more information or email the Association at info@jumpfest.org.

ABOUT SALISBURY WINTER SPORTS ASSOCIATION
In the winter of 1926, John Satre a resident of Salisbury jumped off the roof of his shed wearing skis to show his friends and neighbors a sport he learned in his native homeland of Norway. Town residents were so amazed as they watched Satre soar through the air that they decided to build a proper ski run that summer, and form the Salisbury Winter Sports Association. The Association hosted the first ski jump competition in January 1927. JumpFest has become a highly anticipated event in Connecticut and throughout much of the East Coast.

Fall After School Programs@ Glebe House

If you are looking for a fun and educational after-school activity for your kids look no further than the Glebe House Historic House Museum and Jeykll Garden located on Hollow Road in Woodbury. Give your kids the opportunity to become part of living history at the Glebe House Museum & Gertrude Jekyll Garden – join the Marshall Children Young Docent Program. Here is your chance to really learn about what life was like for families who lived here in Connecticut during the Revolutionary War. You will learn to conduct guided tours of the museum in period costumes and will be taught candle making, quill writing, and other colonial crafts so that you might teach them to other children. You will be doing colonial cooking, visiting area museums, and having lots of fun immersed in the history of the historic house museum on the most historic street in Woodbury.

The Marshall Children Young Docent program is named for the nine children of John and Sarah Marshall who lived in the Glebe House from 1771-1786. These young docents are our greatest ambassadors in the community and participate in events like the Memorial Day Parade and the Woodbury Christmas Festival. All Hollow’s Eve, a wonderfully scary event now in its 21st year would not be the same without the inclusion of our young docents in the roles of some of Woodbury’s early citizens.

The program is open to children 6 & up and meets on select Thursday afternoons from 4:00 – 5:30. The upcoming Fall Session begins on Thursday, October 6th, and will include six meetings.
This is a wonderful opportunity to meet children from all over the region who share your interest in local history. You will become a significant part of the museum experience and enrich those who visit by sharing your enthusiasm and new-found knowledge.

*All CDC and State Health & Safety guidelines will be followed.

Please call the Museum Director for more information and to register at 203-263-2855. Information, registration forms, and scheduled dates are available on our website at www.glebehousemuseum.org.
The cost for the Fall Session is $125/Members and $150/Non-Members. There is limited space available. Registration will remain open until all spaces are filled.

14th Annual Blackberry Festival @ White Silo Farm

Sweet yet tart blackberries are good for you! They are packed with vitamin c, high in fiber,a high source of manganese, vitamin K, and high in antioxidants. One could almost consider blackberries a superfood.

At the White Silo Farm on 32 Rte. 37 in Sherman, they also consider blackberries fun and are once again hosting their annual Blackberry Festival on August 13 and August 14th from 1-4:30 pm. The cost is $25 per person for a 1 ½ hour reservation.

The ticket cost includes four items made with fresh Blackberries – Shredded hoisin blackberry chicken tacos (vegetarian option available), blackberry rhubarb chutney and goat cheese crostini, blackberry arugula and kale salad, and blackberry tiramisu. Guests with reservations will have priority seating if it is raining.

Reservations are limited and can be made on whitesilowinery.com website. Music with Greg “Cowboy”, Saturday 1-4:30 PM and Marty Meyer, Sunday 1-4:30 PM. This is a child and pet friendly event.

Make it a Beach Party to Remember! Sheffield Island @ the Beach July 23, 2022 With the Norwalk Seaport Association

Kick off your sandals, sink your toes in the sand, and grab a cold drink, listen to the music and the sound of the waves because summer 2022 is here. And, what better way to celebrate than with the Norwalk Seaport Association, right on beautiful Calf Pasture Beach in Norwalk. On Saturday, July 23, the Norwalk Seaport Association is hosting an in-person seaside celebration, Sheffield Island @ The Beach from 6:30 p.m. to 10 p.m.

Culinary Delights, Signature Drinks, Music & More!

The Seaport Association has whipped up a recipe for a night to remember! The festivities include delectable specialties from the land and sea by Ripkas Beach Café’s, Chef Clyde, highly esteemed for his culinary creativity. A highlight of Sheffield Island @ the beach will be a Raw Bar of fresh, local clams and oysters that can be washed down with signature cocktails like the Seaport Swizzle, beer, wine, a selection of soft drinks, and infused water.

The culinary delights don’t stop there! For example, delicacies that may be included on the menu for seafood lovers could be mini crab cakes, fried oysters, conch fritters, and, other delights to name a few. Meat lovers aren’t left out and might enjoy mini Cubano bites, coconut curry chicken sate, mini beef kebobs, and more. Vegetarians can indulge at the cheese, crudités, and tapenade tables as well as at the wood-fired pizza station. Many more tantalizing goodies will be served at this amazing beach party that is not to be missed!

Friends, Sunsets, & Laughter all for a Good Cause

A beautiful sunset, seeing friends, S’mores on the beach, fire pits, and music add to the convivial ambiance of this seaside celebration. The tickets @ $125 per person are on sale now and are limited to 125 people. Tickets are available online at seaport.org or by calling the Seaport Office at 203-838-9444, so get them today so you don’t miss out on the fun. Proceeds from this event will be used in the maintenance of Sheffield Island Lighthouse, Connecticut’s Maritime Icon.

About the Seaport Association
The Seaport Association in Norwalk was founded in 1978 by a group of local citizens who had the vision to revitalize South Norwalk and preserve Norwalk’s maritime heritage. The Seaport Association offers a cultural, environmental, and historical journey to the Norwalk Islands. The Sheffield Island Lighthouse and the Light Keeper’s Cottage provide a unique historical and educational venue that strives to increase awareness, appreciation, and consideration for the environment and how the preservation of historic buildings contributes to our quality of life. The combination of the Lighthouse and the Stewart B. McKinney National Wildlife Refuge offers an unparalleled opportunity to educate children of all ages and adults about the importance of preserving Long Island Sound, our environment, and our maritime heritage.

Learn How to Make Native American Leather Pouches @ Institute for American Indian Studies

A Sunday afternoon is the ideal time to learn how to make your own leather Native American style pouch on October 17 @ the Institute for American Indian Studies. This in-person small group workshop has been organized in one-hour time slots from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Under the guidance of the museum’s Education Department, you’ll learn how Native Americans used leather for clothing, pouches, bags, and other items of daily life.

Native Americans historically used leather pouches to carry many of life’s necessities. Pouches were made from a variety of materials, some were woven, and others were made from the hides of different animals, most commonly deer.

Sign up for a workshop that is both educational and engaging, as you learn how to make your very own unique and practical leather pouch that you can decorate with buttons, stones, and shells. After you have completed your project, you may find that you have a newfound appreciation for the artistry that went into making some of the artifacts in the museum’s collections.

Sign up with your friends and family to reserve a timeslot by clicking here. For questions call 860-868-0518 or email general@iaismuseum.org. The cost of participation including materials is $25 per person for non- members and $20 for members.

About the Institute for American Indian Studies
The Institute for American Indian Studies preserves and educates through discovery and creativity the diverse traditions, vitality, and knowledge of Native American cultures. Located on 15 acres of woodland IAIS is home to permanent and temporary exhibits, nature trails, and a replicated 16th century Replicated Algonkian village. During the school year, over 7,000 school-age children visit for hands-on programs to learn about the Indigenous people who have called Connecticut home for thousands of years.

The Trained Eye: The Art of Railroads & Stations @ Lockwood Mathews Mansion

The Lockwood-Mathews Mansion Museum will open a new exhibition entitled, The Trained Eye: The Art of Railroads & Stations, which will run through Sunday, Jan. 5, 2020.

A subject matter explored by some of the great artists of the 19th and early 20th centuries, such as Claude Monet, Edward Hopper, and Camille Pissarro, railroads and stations are familiar places that continue to inspire contemporary artists and impact society and the environment. “The artists featured in the exhibition, The Trained Eye,” said Ms. Ingis, “will look at this kaleidoscope of images and colors and render their own interpretation with works that range from photo-realism to post-impressionism and in a variety of media including oil, watercolor, acrylics, etchings, and photography.”

Curated by artist and Trustee Gail Ingis and Trustee Julyen Norman, the exhibition will feature artists: David Bravo, David Dunlop, Julie O’Connor, DeAnn Prosia, Helen Roman, Alexsander Rotner, Cathy Russell, Anthony Santomauro, Norm Siegel, and Rob Zuckerman.

The contemporary art exhibitions are sponsored in part by Gail Ingis and Tom Claus. The Museum’s 2019 cultural and educational programs are made possible in part by generous funding from LMMM’s Founding Patrons: The Estate of Mrs. Cynthia Clark Brown, LMMM’s 2019 Season Distinguished Benefactors: The City of Norwalk and The Maurice Goodman Foundation. The Lockwood-Mathews Mansion Museum is a National Historic Landmark. For more information on schedules and programs please visit www.lockwoodmathewsmansion.com, e-mail info@lockwoodmathewsmansion.com, or call 203-838-9799.