Give A Basket of Love On Valentine’s Day from Tina’s Baskets & Woven Art

Every relationship is important in life. On Valentine’s Day, sometimes words aren’t enough to convey messages of love, caring, and appreciation. The joy of giving on Valentine’s Day is thriving with possibilities at Studio #305 @ Tina’s Baskets and Woven Arts, Whiting Mills in Winsted. This amazing studio owned by Tina Puckett, a national and international award-winning artist, known for her woven art and dimensional weaving has some extraordinary gift ideas that can be found nowhere else.

Puckett is also, once again, rolling out the red carpet for those in search of an exceptional Valentine’s Day gift. The studio is open every weekend in January and February from 11 a.m. – 4 p.m. or by appointment. While browsing in Puckett’s studio, and chatting with Tina as she weaves her magic, enjoy chocolates and champagne. If you are on the hunt for an unforgettable Valentine’s Day gift basket to fill with goodies, this is the place, a real artist’s studio in fact, to check out!

“I offer many hand-woven baskets from reeds that I dye and bittersweet that I forage, at a variety of price points. Each basket is a one-of-a-kind piece woven with love, and something that can be used repeatedly and, most importantly, loved for years to come.” Best of all, the baskets are 14% off during the Sip and Shop event at Whiting Mills on February 11th, and Sunday, February 12th. This is your chance to purchase a basket and fill it with goodies.

If you can’t make it to the studio, head to the website and order away. Tina is offering a 14% discount on all website purchases from February 1 to February 14, 2023.

Shopping for your Valentine’s is not an easy task, especially when trying to avoid the clichés. A basket from Tina’s Baskets and Woven Art shows your special someone that you truly care.

About Tina’s Baskets
Tina Puckett is a nationally awarded weaver of baskets and woven art that is the owner of Tina’s Baskets which is located at Whiting Mills in Winsted, Connecticut. Tina has been weaving since 1981 using hand-dyed reeds, bittersweet, and a variety of objects like beads or seagrass. Her work is showcased at a variety of galleries across the United States as well as at her gallery/studio where you will often find her weaving on weekends from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Custom orders are accepted and appointments can be arranged by texting 860-309-6934.

See Future Olympians @ Salisbury’s JumpFest Feb. 3-5

This year marks the 97th year of Salisbury Connecticut’s annual Ski Jump Competition called Jumpfest where spectators can watch some of the finest potential Olympic hopefuls compete on Satre Hill, at 80 Indian Cave Road in Salisbury, CT. Even if you have no snow where you live, the organizers of this event make it; so get ready to experience a winter wonderland that has a lot of action!

“If you have never seen ski jumping live, you have never really witnessed this sport,” said Willie Hallihan, Association Director of SWSA (Salisbury Winter Sports Assoc.) “The hint of frost in the air, the cacophony of ringing cowbells, spectators cheering on their favorites, and the slap of skis as they hit the landing hill, make this event unforgettable.”

Jumpfest offers three days of heart-pounding excitement and competitions to watch. The tower stands 70 feet atop Satre Hill and jumpers perch on their bar 350 feet above the ground. As the flag is dropped they speed their way down the 300-foot run, picking up speed along the way. Imagine watching as jumpers soar up to 200 feet through the air at speeds of 50 miles an hour! There are only six ski jumping venues on the East Coast and, Salisbury is among the oldest. Satre Hill is also one of the most respected jump venues because of past hopefuls that have competed in the Olympics.

Jumpfest kicks off on Friday, February 3 at 7 p.m. with target jumping under the lights. This is an exciting warm-up for the events on Saturday and Sunday and a great time to spot your favorites and cheer them on. Target jumping is followed by a crowd favorite, the Human Dog Sled Race where teams of six compete in this madcap event for a variety of prizes. There are only a half dozen places in the country that host this event and most of them are pretty far from Connecticut making this spectacle of fun something not to be missed! If you want to compete contact info@jumpfest.org, the cost is $25 per team with proceeds going to the mission of SWSA, youth skiing programs.

On Saturday, February 4, the day begins at 9:30 a.m. with the Junior Competition on the 20-meter and 30 meter hills. It is thrilling to watch these young athletes that have trained so hard tackle the hills.

The Salisbury Invitational Ski Jumping Competition begins at 11 a.m. with practice jumps followed by the competition that begins at 1 p.m. Jumpers come from far and wide making it exciting to watch them demonstrate their strength, skill, and conditioning that makes them fly effortlessly through the air. At the conclusion of the competition, medals are awarded on the hill. They are the next generation of jumpers to watch.

To end the day on a high note, spectators are invited to attend the “Snowball” taking place at the Lakeville Town Grove at 42 Ethan Allen Street from 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. There will be plenty of food and music by the Steve Dunn Band at this beautiful venue replete with a stone fireplace and chandeliers. Entry to the Snowball is $20 per person with children under 12 free.

On Sunday, February 5, the highly anticipated Eastern U.S. Ski Jumping Championships begins with practice jumps that run from 11 a.m. through noon. The long-awaited annual competition starts at 1 pm. At this event, there are often Olympic hopefuls competing. These expert jumpers seem fearless as they display the tremendous coordination, skill, balance, and strength that it takes to soar so far and so high in the air and, most importantly, to land smoothly. If you want to see some of the bravest athletes in sports just stand at the bottom of a ski jump and watch them soar. It is something that you will never forget because as most jumpers will tell you, it is the closest you get to flying…without wings or a parachute!

To add to the festivities there are food trucks, craft beer, hot toddies, and bonfires on all three days. Tickets are available at the gate and are $15 for adults on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday. Kids 12 and under are free all three days. Parking is free. The ski jump complex is located at Satre Hill on Indian Cave Road in Salisbury. Proceeds for Jumpfest fund the SWSA youth skiing programs. Before setting out check www.jumpfest.org for updates, scheduled changes, or more information or email the Association at info@jumpfest.org.

ABOUT SALISBURY WINTER SPORTS ASSOCIATION
In the winter of 1926, John Satre a resident of Salisbury jumped off the roof of his shed wearing skis to show his friends and neighbors a sport he learned in his native homeland of Norway. Town residents were so amazed as they watched Satre soar through the air that they decided to build a proper ski run that summer, and form the Salisbury Winter Sports Association. The Association hosted the first ski jump competition in January 1927. JumpFest has become a highly anticipated event in Connecticut and throughout much of the East Coast.

Weekend Workshops – Paper Dolls @ Wilton Historical Society

Paper dolls have been a common toy for centuries across the globe. Traditionally, in the United States and Europe, paper dolls have consisted of figures cut out of paper or thin card stock, with clothing fashioned out of paper held onto the dolls with paper folding tabs. Mass production of these dolls began in the early 1800s and continued into the 20th century.

On Saturday, September 10, from 11:00-12:00, the Wilton Historical Society will be offering a paper doll-making workshop for kids. The workshop will feature pre-cut paper figures which can be decorated with a variety of paper outfits, led by Museum Educator Catherine Lipper, who will also share her collection of three Madam Alexander dolls in pristine condition. The morning promises to be a great opportunity for creativity and fun!

According to the University of Chicago Library, early paper dolls created in Europe frequently depicted actors or actresses who were used similarly to puppet shows on toy stages. Dressmakers used articulated dolls for a more practical purpose – as miniature models for clothing designs. Wilton Historical holds several paper dolls in its collection including one from 1890.

This program is suggested for ages 6 – 10. Members are $10 per child, and Non-members are $15 per child. The Wilton Historical Society is located on 224 Danbury Road and is open Tuesday – Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Labor Day Sale @ Hitchcock Chair Company

Fall is quickly approaching – it’s time to think about the holidays and family gatherings. Visit the Hitchcok Chair Showroom at 2 School Street in beautiful Riverton, Connecticut, and browse our beautifully handcrafted furniture; all made here in the USA.

The sale takes place September 2-4 and there are great savings on dining and living room sets. Enjoy dinner for two, or gather friends and family for a feast around their casual dining set. Another option is to complete your family room with Hitchcock’s Rocking Chairs, End Tables, Coffee Tables; Benchs, and elegant and comfortable Lancer upholstery. There are many items to choose from!

Afterward, stop for lunch or dinner at the Old Riverton Inn which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The Inn sits on the National Wild and Scenic Farmington River. This historic tavern has been a stagecoach stop for centuries.

If the walls could talk they might tell tales of the early days when the Inn was known as Ive’s Tavern, a welcome sight on the old Albany to Hartford Post Road. They might mention the many restorations and expansions through the years, and certainly, they would speak about the growth of furniture making in Riverton, where the famous Hitchcock chairs were produced for over a century. A favorite story would tell of Harper Lee’s many visits because she so enjoyed the area as a place to write. There were several rival stage companies in operation between New Hartford and Riverton. Each stage driver stopped at his favorite inn, where he received special favors in return for bringing his passenger to that tavern.

14th Annual Blackberry Festival @ White Silo Farm

Sweet yet tart blackberries are good for you! They are packed with vitamin c, high in fiber,a high source of manganese, vitamin K, and high in antioxidants. One could almost consider blackberries a superfood.

At the White Silo Farm on 32 Rte. 37 in Sherman, they also consider blackberries fun and are once again hosting their annual Blackberry Festival on August 13 and August 14th from 1-4:30 pm. The cost is $25 per person for a 1 ½ hour reservation.

The ticket cost includes four items made with fresh Blackberries – Shredded hoisin blackberry chicken tacos (vegetarian option available), blackberry rhubarb chutney and goat cheese crostini, blackberry arugula and kale salad, and blackberry tiramisu. Guests with reservations will have priority seating if it is raining.

Reservations are limited and can be made on whitesilowinery.com website. Music with Greg “Cowboy”, Saturday 1-4:30 PM and Marty Meyer, Sunday 1-4:30 PM. This is a child and pet friendly event.

Wigwam Construction @ Institute for American Indian Studies July 23

A Wigwam is a type of home created from tree bark. These structures are found throughout pre-contact New England. One of the few places where you can see a replica of 16th-century wigwams in the setting of a traditional Native American village is at the Institute for American Indian Studies on 38 Curtis Road in Washington, Connecticut.

On July 23, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. join Griffin Kalin, Educator at the Institute for American Indian Studies and Traditional Skills Expert for an interactive discussion and program about wigwam construction and the science and technology used to build them. This program will take place at the Institute’s 16th-century replicated Algonquian village that consists of several wigwams, a longhouse, a fire circle, drying racks, and the three sisters’ garden. Participants will learn what types of wood need to be harvested and the types of tools that would be used to build a wigwam. A highlight of this program is watching the actual repairs to the structures in the village to learn about this ancient process. Griffin is a wealth of knowledge and will be there to answer questions and give material demonstrations.

Pre-registration is appreciated and can be made by visiting www.iaismuseum.org to reserve a space through Eventbrite. If you have questions, call 860-868-0518 or email events@iaismuseum.org. This program is $5 per participant and free for members. This doesn’t include admission to the museum.

About The Institute for American Indian Studies
Located on 15 acres of woodland acres the Institute For American Indian Studies preserves and educates through archeology, research, exhibitions, and programs. They have a 16th c. Algonquian Village, Award-Winning Wigwam Escape, and a museum with temporary and permanent displays of authentic artifacts from prehistory to the present that allows visitors to foster a new understanding of the world and the history and culture of Native Americans. The Institute for American Indian Studies is located at 38 Curtis Road, Washington, CT.