Learn How to Make Native American Leather Pouches @ Institute for American Indian Studies

A Sunday afternoon is the ideal time to learn how to make your own leather Native American style pouch on October 17 @ the Institute for American Indian Studies. This in-person small group workshop has been organized in one-hour time slots from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Under the guidance of the museum’s Education Department, you’ll learn how Native Americans used leather for clothing, pouches, bags, and other items of daily life.

Native Americans historically used leather pouches to carry many of life’s necessities. Pouches were made from a variety of materials, some were woven, and others were made from the hides of different animals, most commonly deer.

Sign up for a workshop that is both educational and engaging, as you learn how to make your very own unique and practical leather pouch that you can decorate with buttons, stones, and shells. After you have completed your project, you may find that you have a newfound appreciation for the artistry that went into making some of the artifacts in the museum’s collections.

Sign up with your friends and family to reserve a timeslot by clicking here. For questions call 860-868-0518 or email general@iaismuseum.org. The cost of participation including materials is $25 per person for non- members and $20 for members.

About the Institute for American Indian Studies
The Institute for American Indian Studies preserves and educates through discovery and creativity the diverse traditions, vitality, and knowledge of Native American cultures. Located on 15 acres of woodland IAIS is home to permanent and temporary exhibits, nature trails, and a replicated 16th century Replicated Algonkian village. During the school year, over 7,000 school-age children visit for hands-on programs to learn about the Indigenous people who have called Connecticut home for thousands of years.

Take a Harbor Cruise on the 4th of July Week and Weekend with the Seaport Association

The Sheffield Island Lighthouse is an iconic symbol of Connecticut’s maritime history.  This historic lighthouse and light keeper’s cottage is located at the southern end of Norwalk’s necklace of islands on the west entrance of the Norwalk River in Long Island Sound. One of the best ways to kick of the season is to take a cruise on the C.J. Toth on Wednesday, July 1, Thursday, July 2, and Friday, July 3 at 11:30 a.m. and 2 p.m. There will also be a sunset cruise on all three days beginning at 6:30 p.m.  Tickets for this exciting excursion must be purchased in advance by clicking here.

And, if you are looking to start a summer tradition or renew one, reserve your tickets for a fabulous 4th of July weekend ride with the Seaport Association this summer!  The boat will be going out on Saturday, July 4, and Sunday, July 5 at 12 noon, and at 3 p.m. and the sunset cruise will depart on both days at 6:30 p.m. For tickets click here.

This year the Seaport cruise will take you on a breathtaking tour of the outer Norwalk Harbor where passengers will get a birds-eye view of this active and fascinating place, from the water! The cruise will then take visitors on a cruise that will take them up close to three historic lighthouses that have protected the harbor for centuries. Have your camera at the ready for unique water views of Green’s Ledge and Pecks Ledge, two of only 33 remaining spark plug lighthouses in the United States. The real highlight of this cruise is to see Sheffield Island Lighthouse, Connecticut’s iconic maritime treasure up close and from the water. Sheffield Lighthouse has been a beacon to mariners since 1868 and to see it from the water, like mariners of old is a very special experience. 

If you can’t make it on this cruise, no worries, the Seaport Association is running two daily cruises and one sunset cruise Wednesday – Sunday through August. All tickets must be purchased online in advance and all passengers must follow the Seaport’s COVID protocols and must wear a mask. For the protocols click here.

Institute for American Indian Studies Modified Summer Camp June 26-August 7, 2020

We all know that this summer will be different. We also know that it is important for children to get out of the house and be engaged socially, mentally, and safely. With that in mind, the Institute for American Indian Studies located on 38 Curtis Road in Washington, Connecticut announced that they are opening a modified summer camp program of weekly themed outdoor fun and education that follows strict state guidelines. The Summer Camp is available one week at a time, Monday- Friday, 9 a.m. – 3 p.m., from June 26 through August 7. The programs are geared for children ages 6-13. “We decided to offer our camp programs because we feel it can be a gateway back to normalcy for children. We expect these experiences will help our young campers face new challenges with resilience,” Chris Combs, Executive Director said.

There are so many benefits to sending children to summer camp, especially this summer. It gives children the chance to develop confidence and get unplugged; it allows them to make new friends, experience the great outdoors, and to explore new interests while learning at the same time. “This year, parents can definitely expect to see safety as the first and foremost focus at our camp, Chris Combs, Executive Director said. “ For all of our staff, the health and safety of our campers is paramount. All camp activities will be held outdoors and there will be regular sanitizing, social distancing, and smaller group activities as well as staggered arrivals and pick-ups, all in accordance with guidance issued by various state and federal agencies,” Combs continued. For more information, registration and protocols click here

Camp Director Gabriel Benjamin and Assistant Camp Director Susan Scherf have developed a range of exciting activities and projects that follow current health guidelines. Each week, campers will join experienced educators on a journey through one of several themes that relate to the museum’s core mission, such as ecology, archaeology, and traditional skills. While hiking in the woods, playing games, and creating crafts, campers will practice survival skills, teamwork, and problem-solvinghttp://www.iaismuseum.org as they develop confidence while experiencing the great outdoors, and making new friends. Besides the memories that will last a lifetime, campers will learn valuable skills and connect with a culture that has more than 10,000 years of history in this area.

Summer Camp Themes
Weekly camps will have different experiences. On June 29- July 3 the theme is “Wonderful Wildlife” and will include exploring the forests and rivers of the Eastern Woodlands. The camp running from July 6- July 10 will focus on the gifts of the natural world and how Native Americans used their understanding of the natural world to thrive for thousands of years right here in Connecticut.

On July 13 to July 17, children will learn outdoor survival skills similar to those used for centuries by Native Americans. And, if your children love science and technology sign them up for the week of July 20-24 to learn how people of the past figured out creative ways to move around, construct shelter, find food, and make tools.”

For budding archeologists and kids that are intrigued by puzzles, don’t miss the July 27 – July 31 camp where they will learn how to dig and discover.

The last camp of our 2020 summer season, from August 3-7 is for kids that like a challenge – and don’t they all! If your kids want to be amazed, sign them up, and challenge them to put their skills to test! They will come away enriched and confident.

For complete registration information, visit http://www.iaismuseum.org.

About The Institute for American Indian Studies
L
ocated on 15 acres of woodland acres the Institute For American Indian Studies preserves and educates through archeology, research, exhibitions, and programs. They have the 16th c. Algonquian Village, Award-Winning Wigwam Escape, and a museum with temporary and permanent displays of authentic artifacts from prehistory to the present that allows visitors to foster a new understanding of the world and the history and culture of Native Americans. The Institute for American Indian Studies is located on 38 Curtis Road, Washington, CT.

Connecticut’s Beardsley Zoo Makes the Holidays Merry and Bright at Breakfast with Frosty and Friends

Connecticut’s Beardsley Zoo located on 1875 Noble Avenue, Bridgeport, has a longtime family tradition: Breakfast with Frosty! A full buffet breakfast in the Carousel Building includes a visit with Santa and his elf, photo opportunities with Frosty the Snowman, Stripes the Tiger, and Thirsty the Penguin, carousel rides and lots of family fun. These breakfasts sell out every year, but there’s still time for local families from around the region to enjoy the holidays at the Zoo! Pre-Registration is required: https://www.beardsleyzoo.org/breakfast-with-frosty.html

Breakfast with Frosty requires online reservation & pre-payment is required to attend. All days but December 14th are $20 per person for Zoo Members and $25 per person for non-Members. December 14 (Special Activities Day!) prices are $25 for members and $30 for non-members. Children 2 years old and younger are free.

Frosty will be visiting the Zoo on Saturday and Sunday, December 7 and 8, Saturday and Sunday, December 14 and 15 and Saturday and Sunday, December 21 and 22. In addition to Frosty the Snowman, kids will visit with Santa Claus and his Head Elf, Stripes the Tiger, and Thirsty the Penguin

About Connecticut’s Beardsley Zoo

Let your curiosity run wild! Connecticut’s only zoo, celebrating its 97th year, features 300 animals representing primarily North and South American species. Guests won’t want to miss our Amur tigers and leopards, Mexican and Red wolves, and Golden Lion tamarin. Other highlights include our Spider Monkey Habitat, the Natt Family Red Panda Habitat, the prairie dog exhibit with “pop-up” viewing areas, plus the Pampas Plains featuring maned wolves, Chacoan peccaries and Giant anteaters. Guests can grab a bite at the Peacock Café, eat in the Picnic Grove, and enjoy a ride on our colorful, indoor carousel. For more information, visit beardsleyzoo.org.

Images – Jack Bradley

WonderSpark Puppets present The Gingerbread Man

On November 30 from 2 pm to 3 pm the Wilton Historical Society located on 224 Danbury Road is hosting a special puppet show from NY that is noted as the best puppet theatre in NYC from 2 pm to 3 pm.

The show called Run, run as fast as you can can – you can’t catch me I’m the Gingerbread Man is the classic story of a little running cookie – with a Christmas twist. Kids will watch the Gingerbread Man outwit and outrun various hungry animals – and figure out what he really wants for Christmas. During the show, the children will listen, laugh, interact directly with characters, and can ask questions about puppetry and storytelling afterward. This ancient art form engages the imagination and kickstarts a love of theater at an early age. Best of all, you get a theater experience in a historic barn!

After the show, there will be a puppet craft activity. This event is $10 per person and tickets are available online. To get your tickets, click here.

Cider, Cookies and Shopping @ Fairfield Museum and History Center

This weekend, the Fairfield Museum and History Center located on Beach Street is offering several exciting promotions. On Saturday, November 30 they are celebrating small business Saturday by offering a card special.  Folks visiting the museum gift shop, which is chock full of goodies who purchase five packs of cards by Onion Hill by Kassie Foss will get one free! 

The fun ramps up on Sunday, December 1 when the museum store will give visitors a reusable Fairfield Museum shopping bag and a limited edition Woodberry pewter ornament with every purchase while supplies last. 

To add to the festivities, the Fairfield Museum and History Center is offering free cookies and cider all weekend long. The shop is located at 370 Beach Street and is open from 10 am to 4 pm with plenty of on-site parking.  Another perk is that the museum never charged sales tax! 

Save the date for the Holiday Express Train opening night on December 6 from 5 pm to 8 pm that is kicked off with the tree lighting on the Fairfield Green. The hours for the Holiday Express Train are Monday – Thursday 10am – 1pm, Special Friday Evening Hours: 10am – 7pm, Saturdays & Sundays: 10am – 4pm, December 23, 24, 26, 30 and 31: 10am – 4pm, Closed Christmas Day and New Year’s Day