Give A Basket of Love On Valentine’s Day from Tina’s Baskets & Woven Art

Every relationship is important in life. On Valentine’s Day, sometimes words aren’t enough to convey messages of love, caring, and appreciation. The joy of giving on Valentine’s Day is thriving with possibilities at Studio #305 @ Tina’s Baskets and Woven Arts, Whiting Mills in Winsted. This amazing studio owned by Tina Puckett, a national and international award-winning artist, known for her woven art and dimensional weaving has some extraordinary gift ideas that can be found nowhere else.

Puckett is also, once again, rolling out the red carpet for those in search of an exceptional Valentine’s Day gift. The studio is open every weekend in January and February from 11 a.m. – 4 p.m. or by appointment. While browsing in Puckett’s studio, and chatting with Tina as she weaves her magic, enjoy chocolates and champagne. If you are on the hunt for an unforgettable Valentine’s Day gift basket to fill with goodies, this is the place, a real artist’s studio in fact, to check out!

“I offer many hand-woven baskets from reeds that I dye and bittersweet that I forage, at a variety of price points. Each basket is a one-of-a-kind piece woven with love, and something that can be used repeatedly and, most importantly, loved for years to come.” Best of all, the baskets are 14% off during the Sip and Shop event at Whiting Mills on February 11th, and Sunday, February 12th. This is your chance to purchase a basket and fill it with goodies.

If you can’t make it to the studio, head to the website and order away. Tina is offering a 14% discount on all website purchases from February 1 to February 14, 2023.

Shopping for your Valentine’s is not an easy task, especially when trying to avoid the clichés. A basket from Tina’s Baskets and Woven Art shows your special someone that you truly care.

About Tina’s Baskets
Tina Puckett is a nationally awarded weaver of baskets and woven art that is the owner of Tina’s Baskets which is located at Whiting Mills in Winsted, Connecticut. Tina has been weaving since 1981 using hand-dyed reeds, bittersweet, and a variety of objects like beads or seagrass. Her work is showcased at a variety of galleries across the United States as well as at her gallery/studio where you will often find her weaving on weekends from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Custom orders are accepted and appointments can be arranged by texting 860-309-6934.

Weekend Workshops – Paper Dolls @ Wilton Historical Society

Paper dolls have been a common toy for centuries across the globe. Traditionally, in the United States and Europe, paper dolls have consisted of figures cut out of paper or thin card stock, with clothing fashioned out of paper held onto the dolls with paper folding tabs. Mass production of these dolls began in the early 1800s and continued into the 20th century.

On Saturday, September 10, from 11:00-12:00, the Wilton Historical Society will be offering a paper doll-making workshop for kids. The workshop will feature pre-cut paper figures which can be decorated with a variety of paper outfits, led by Museum Educator Catherine Lipper, who will also share her collection of three Madam Alexander dolls in pristine condition. The morning promises to be a great opportunity for creativity and fun!

According to the University of Chicago Library, early paper dolls created in Europe frequently depicted actors or actresses who were used similarly to puppet shows on toy stages. Dressmakers used articulated dolls for a more practical purpose – as miniature models for clothing designs. Wilton Historical holds several paper dolls in its collection including one from 1890.

This program is suggested for ages 6 – 10. Members are $10 per child, and Non-members are $15 per child. The Wilton Historical Society is located on 224 Danbury Road and is open Tuesday – Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Labor Day Sale @ Hitchcock Chair Company

Fall is quickly approaching – it’s time to think about the holidays and family gatherings. Visit the Hitchcok Chair Showroom at 2 School Street in beautiful Riverton, Connecticut, and browse our beautifully handcrafted furniture; all made here in the USA.

The sale takes place September 2-4 and there are great savings on dining and living room sets. Enjoy dinner for two, or gather friends and family for a feast around their casual dining set. Another option is to complete your family room with Hitchcock’s Rocking Chairs, End Tables, Coffee Tables; Benchs, and elegant and comfortable Lancer upholstery. There are many items to choose from!

Afterward, stop for lunch or dinner at the Old Riverton Inn which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The Inn sits on the National Wild and Scenic Farmington River. This historic tavern has been a stagecoach stop for centuries.

If the walls could talk they might tell tales of the early days when the Inn was known as Ive’s Tavern, a welcome sight on the old Albany to Hartford Post Road. They might mention the many restorations and expansions through the years, and certainly, they would speak about the growth of furniture making in Riverton, where the famous Hitchcock chairs were produced for over a century. A favorite story would tell of Harper Lee’s many visits because she so enjoyed the area as a place to write. There were several rival stage companies in operation between New Hartford and Riverton. Each stage driver stopped at his favorite inn, where he received special favors in return for bringing his passenger to that tavern.

14th Annual Blackberry Festival @ White Silo Farm

Sweet yet tart blackberries are good for you! They are packed with vitamin c, high in fiber,a high source of manganese, vitamin K, and high in antioxidants. One could almost consider blackberries a superfood.

At the White Silo Farm on 32 Rte. 37 in Sherman, they also consider blackberries fun and are once again hosting their annual Blackberry Festival on August 13 and August 14th from 1-4:30 pm. The cost is $25 per person for a 1 ½ hour reservation.

The ticket cost includes four items made with fresh Blackberries – Shredded hoisin blackberry chicken tacos (vegetarian option available), blackberry rhubarb chutney and goat cheese crostini, blackberry arugula and kale salad, and blackberry tiramisu. Guests with reservations will have priority seating if it is raining.

Reservations are limited and can be made on whitesilowinery.com website. Music with Greg “Cowboy”, Saturday 1-4:30 PM and Marty Meyer, Sunday 1-4:30 PM. This is a child and pet friendly event.

Wigwam Construction @ Institute for American Indian Studies July 23

A Wigwam is a type of home created from tree bark. These structures are found throughout pre-contact New England. One of the few places where you can see a replica of 16th-century wigwams in the setting of a traditional Native American village is at the Institute for American Indian Studies on 38 Curtis Road in Washington, Connecticut.

On July 23, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. join Griffin Kalin, Educator at the Institute for American Indian Studies and Traditional Skills Expert for an interactive discussion and program about wigwam construction and the science and technology used to build them. This program will take place at the Institute’s 16th-century replicated Algonquian village that consists of several wigwams, a longhouse, a fire circle, drying racks, and the three sisters’ garden. Participants will learn what types of wood need to be harvested and the types of tools that would be used to build a wigwam. A highlight of this program is watching the actual repairs to the structures in the village to learn about this ancient process. Griffin is a wealth of knowledge and will be there to answer questions and give material demonstrations.

Pre-registration is appreciated and can be made by visiting www.iaismuseum.org to reserve a space through Eventbrite. If you have questions, call 860-868-0518 or email events@iaismuseum.org. This program is $5 per participant and free for members. This doesn’t include admission to the museum.

About The Institute for American Indian Studies
Located on 15 acres of woodland acres the Institute For American Indian Studies preserves and educates through archeology, research, exhibitions, and programs. They have a 16th c. Algonquian Village, Award-Winning Wigwam Escape, and a museum with temporary and permanent displays of authentic artifacts from prehistory to the present that allows visitors to foster a new understanding of the world and the history and culture of Native Americans. The Institute for American Indian Studies is located at 38 Curtis Road, Washington, CT.

An Ecology Walk Along the Shepaug River With the Institute for American Indian Studies

A summer walk along the Shepaug River that runs through Washington is a rewarding experience, especially when guided by IAIS Educator and Ecologist, Susan Scherf on Saturday, July 9 at 10 a.m. The cost of this program hosted by the Institute for American Indian Studies on 38 Curtis Road in Washington Connecticut is $10 for adults, $8 for seniors, $6 for children, and $5 for members. This hike is perfect for nature lovers and will have them looking at the natural world in a new and exciting way.

Fun on the Shepaug

The Shepaug River whose Native American name means “rocky waters” has a long history of habitation. Native Americans have lived overlooking this river for thousands of years. Many stone tools and items such as bone needles and punches, wooden spear shafts, tool handles, and much more have been found in archeological excavations along the banks of the Shepaug.

Rivers are considered the lifeline of ecosystems around the world. On this guided walk participants will learn that Native peoples traditionally recognized that all beings are interconnected. An important life lesson of this walk is to realize that we can learn about our environment by observing wildlife, plants, trees, and flowers. Summer is one of the best times to observe wildlife along the Shepaug from watching a great blue heron hunt to listening to frogs croaking, and feeling the exoskeleton of a crayfish. Walking along this babbling river Susan will discuss animal adaptations and explain what to look and listen for when trying to identify different species in the Eastern Woodland environment.

Participants should wear sturdy hiking or walking shoes, and be prepared to walk about a mile along the river with frequent stops along the way. Participants are encouraged to bring water and extra shoes or sandals to change into down by the river. Space on this hike is limited and pre-registration is required. To reserve your space visit http://www.iaismuseum.org to reserve a space through Eventbrite. If you have questions, call 860-868-0518 or email events@iaismuseum.org.