Make it a Beach Party to Remember! Sheffield Island @ the Beach July 23, 2022 With the Norwalk Seaport Association

Kick off your sandals, sink your toes in the sand, and grab a cold drink, listen to the music and the sound of the waves because summer 2022 is here. And, what better way to celebrate than with the Norwalk Seaport Association, right on beautiful Calf Pasture Beach in Norwalk. On Saturday, July 23, the Norwalk Seaport Association is hosting an in-person seaside celebration, Sheffield Island @ The Beach from 6:30 p.m. to 10 p.m.

Culinary Delights, Signature Drinks, Music & More!

The Seaport Association has whipped up a recipe for a night to remember! The festivities include delectable specialties from the land and sea by Ripkas Beach Café’s, Chef Clyde, highly esteemed for his culinary creativity. A highlight of Sheffield Island @ the beach will be a Raw Bar of fresh, local clams and oysters that can be washed down with signature cocktails like the Seaport Swizzle, beer, wine, a selection of soft drinks, and infused water.

The culinary delights don’t stop there! For example, delicacies that may be included on the menu for seafood lovers could be mini crab cakes, fried oysters, conch fritters, and, other delights to name a few. Meat lovers aren’t left out and might enjoy mini Cubano bites, coconut curry chicken sate, mini beef kebobs, and more. Vegetarians can indulge at the cheese, crudités, and tapenade tables as well as at the wood-fired pizza station. Many more tantalizing goodies will be served at this amazing beach party that is not to be missed!

Friends, Sunsets, & Laughter all for a Good Cause

A beautiful sunset, seeing friends, S’mores on the beach, fire pits, and music add to the convivial ambiance of this seaside celebration. The tickets @ $125 per person are on sale now and are limited to 125 people. Tickets are available online at seaport.org or by calling the Seaport Office at 203-838-9444, so get them today so you don’t miss out on the fun. Proceeds from this event will be used in the maintenance of Sheffield Island Lighthouse, Connecticut’s Maritime Icon.

About the Seaport Association
The Seaport Association in Norwalk was founded in 1978 by a group of local citizens who had the vision to revitalize South Norwalk and preserve Norwalk’s maritime heritage. The Seaport Association offers a cultural, environmental, and historical journey to the Norwalk Islands. The Sheffield Island Lighthouse and the Light Keeper’s Cottage provide a unique historical and educational venue that strives to increase awareness, appreciation, and consideration for the environment and how the preservation of historic buildings contributes to our quality of life. The combination of the Lighthouse and the Stewart B. McKinney National Wildlife Refuge offers an unparalleled opportunity to educate children of all ages and adults about the importance of preserving Long Island Sound, our environment, and our maritime heritage.

2ND ANNUAL LITCHFIELD HILLS CREATIVE FESTIVAL

The NWCT Arts Council is hosting the second annual Litchfield Hills Creative Festival on Saturday, August 20 in Downtown Torrington. The festival will include artist vendors at Franklin Plaza, an evening beer garden to support the Arts Council, a block party on Main Street, live music, open artist studios and workshops, and many other public activities for all ages hosted by participating organizations and venues. All events will be presented for free to the public.

This year’s Litchfield Hills Creative Festival is sponsored by Housatonic Heritage, Torrington Savings Bank, Northwest Community Bank, Thomaston Savings Bank, Matthews Group, Torrington Downtown Partners, Eversource, WSHU Radio, WAPJ Radio, the Republican American, and O&G Industries.

A variety of local artists and artisans will hold booths at Franklin Plaza with original works of art, clothing, jewelry, books, and more, for sale from 11 am to 4 pm.

At 2 pm, The Warner Theatre will hold a performance of “The Lightning Thief: The Percy Jackson Musical”, performed by the teens of the Warner Theatre’s Summer Arts Program, sponsored by Frederick A. DeLuca Foundation, and the AKC Fund. The performance is free and open to the public and will be shown in the Nancy Marine Studio Theatre.

The Warner Theatre will also host the first-ever Warner Block Party, at 5 pm on Main Street in downtown Torrington. The Main Stage will be emceed by national performing artist, Lucinda Rowe, co-owner of the Red Room Sound Studio. The setlist will begin with performances by Lee Totten, Frank Viele, and Audio Jane, and end with a headlining performance by Jason Ingriselli & the Miles North Band. The Block Party is sponsored by Red Room Sound Studio, Building Healthier Communities Fund, and the AKC Fund.

Participating artists will open their studios to the public from 2 to 6 pm. Buskers organized by Rock Yer Block will be playing at various locations downtown throughout the day. Other events include an open yoga class with Sanctuary Power Yoga, an art opening featuring work by Sophia DeJesus-Sabella at Howard’s Bookstore, an old-fashioned candy-making workshop at the Nutmeg Fudge Company, as well as events with Five Points Gallery, the Nutmeg Ballet, Artroom Atelier, Culture 4 a Cause, Our Culture is Beautiful, Trinity Church, and KidsPlay Children’s Museum. From 6 pm to 10 pm, street performers including stilt walkers and fire spinners will be performing.

For full details about the Litchfield Hills Creative Festival, visit artsnwct.org/litchfield-hills-creative-festival

An Ecology Walk Along the Shepaug River With the Institute for American Indian Studies

A summer walk along the Shepaug River that runs through Washington is a rewarding experience, especially when guided by IAIS Educator and Ecologist, Susan Scherf on Saturday, July 9 at 10 a.m. The cost of this program hosted by the Institute for American Indian Studies on 38 Curtis Road in Washington Connecticut is $10 for adults, $8 for seniors, $6 for children, and $5 for members. This hike is perfect for nature lovers and will have them looking at the natural world in a new and exciting way.

Fun on the Shepaug

The Shepaug River whose Native American name means “rocky waters” has a long history of habitation. Native Americans have lived overlooking this river for thousands of years. Many stone tools and items such as bone needles and punches, wooden spear shafts, tool handles, and much more have been found in archeological excavations along the banks of the Shepaug.

Rivers are considered the lifeline of ecosystems around the world. On this guided walk participants will learn that Native peoples traditionally recognized that all beings are interconnected. An important life lesson of this walk is to realize that we can learn about our environment by observing wildlife, plants, trees, and flowers. Summer is one of the best times to observe wildlife along the Shepaug from watching a great blue heron hunt to listening to frogs croaking, and feeling the exoskeleton of a crayfish. Walking along this babbling river Susan will discuss animal adaptations and explain what to look and listen for when trying to identify different species in the Eastern Woodland environment.

Participants should wear sturdy hiking or walking shoes, and be prepared to walk about a mile along the river with frequent stops along the way. Participants are encouraged to bring water and extra shoes or sandals to change into down by the river. Space on this hike is limited and pre-registration is required. To reserve your space visit http://www.iaismuseum.org to reserve a space through Eventbrite. If you have questions, call 860-868-0518 or email events@iaismuseum.org.

Lacrosse – More Than Just A Game New Exhibition @ Institute for American Indian Studies

Lacrosse was originally played by eastern Native Americans and Canada’s First People. The Institute for American Indian Studies located at 38 Curtis Road in Washington Connecticut has just opened a fascinating special exhibition, “More Than a Game: The Story of Lacrosse,” that will be on view at the Institute through August 2022.

This well-researched exhibition touches on a variety of subjects, many of which are unexpected in light of the game many of us know today. Some of the most interesting aspects of the exhibition relate to the spiritual importance of lacrosse and how it connects to creation stories, the way they settle differences, and its continued social and communal significance.

This exhibition also explores the appropriation of lacrosse by Euro-Americans and Canadians. In the 1860’s Dr. George Beers of Canada wrote the first standardized rulebook for lacrosse in an attempt to “civilize” the game. By the 1890s, Native American communities were banned from participating in national competitions. This part of the exhibition includes documentation in the form of newspaper clippings and images that depict the history of lacrosse in popular culture and how it was interpreted.

More Than a Game also highlights how traditional lacrosse sticks evolved in North America. Several lacrosse sticks on display showcase the three major styles of Native American lacrosse and demonstrate the different regional interpretations of the game.

This exhibit touches on the relationship between lacrosse and Native communities today. It delves into the saga of the Iroquois Nationals, the only Native American athletic team
permitted to compete in international competitions. Don’t miss the exhibition’s video that shows Native Americans making wooden sticks in the traditional way and relating why it is important to the future of their culture. This exhibit can be summed up by a quote by Rex Lyons, Onondaga, “Lacrosse is part of the story of our creation, of our identity, of who we are. So when we play the game, we always say that there’s a simultaneous game going on in the Sky World and our ancestors are playing with us.”

The Institute for American Indian Studies is open Wednesday – Sunday 11 a.m. – 4 p.m. and admission is $12 for adults, $8 for children 3-12, $10 for seniors, and members are free.

About Institute for American Indian Studies
Located on 15 acres of woodland acres the Institute For American Indian Studies preserves and educates through archeology, research, exhibitions, and programs. They have the 16th c. Algonquian Village, Award-Winning Wigwam Escape, and a museum with temporary and permanent displays of authentic artifacts from prehistory to the present that allows visitors to foster a new understanding of the world and the history and culture of Native Americans. The Institute for American Indian Studies is located on 38 Curtis Road, Washington, CT.

Docktails & Oysters @ Norwalk’s Norm Bloom & Sons A Special Event Hosted by the Seaport Association

Who doesn’t enjoy hors d’ouves, cocktails, and oysters on the dock? It is a veritable summer tradition in Norwalk and one that the Seaport Association has embraced. Back by popular demand, Docktails & Oysters is the Seaport Association’s signature event on the dock at Norm Bloom and Son, a fourth-generation oyster farm in Norwalk. This seaside, fun-filled event for gourmands is taking place on Saturday, June 4, 2022, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.

This Luau-inspired party will get you in an “aloha state of mind” as you see folks in brightly colored Hawaiian shirts, listening to live beach music, sipping cocktails, and slurping the freshest oysters you will ever taste! “It’s a chance for folks to get to know what the Seaport Association does, have a little fun, and experience an authentic oyster farm,” said Mike Reilly, President of the Seaport Association.

If you have never had oysters, literally fresh off the boat this is an unforgettable opportunity to eat your fill of them – our advice is to come hungry! It’s fun to watch the pros shuck the oysters before your eyes (they make it look so easy) and set them on trays with lemons and an assortment of sauces. In addition to the unlimited clam and oyster bar, this Luau-themed event also offers passed and tabled appetizers such as citrus grilled shrimp, house-smoked pork sliders, and blackened swordfish tacos with pineapple salsa, vegetable spring rolls, and black bean and corn salad, in keeping with the island vibe.

An added bonus is the opportunity to explore the dock at Norm Bloom Oysters and Son, one of the few remaining traditional oyster farms in the United States to learn how oysters are grown and harvested. The oysters are incubated under the dock and, when they are big enough, they are “planted” on the sandy bottom of the Sound that surrounds you. The result of this time-consuming and meticulous process is some of the best oysters you will ever taste. Norwalk oysters are prized worldwide and known for their sweet briny flavor and plump meats.

Tickets to this event are limited and are $75 online and $85 @ the door. For more information and to get your tickets http://www.seaport.org, if you have questions, call 203-838-9444.

About the Norwalk Seaport Association

The Norwalk Seaport Association was founded in 1978 by a group of local citizens who had the vision to revitalize South Norwalk and preserve Norwalk’s maritime heritage. The Seaport Association offers a cultural, environmental, and historical journey to the Norwalk Islands. The Sheffield Island Lighthouse and the Light Keeper’s Cottage provide a unique historical and educational venue that strives to increase awareness, appreciation, and consideration for the environment and how the preservation of historic buildings contributes to our quality of life. The combination of the Lighthouse and the Stewart B. McKinney National Wildlife Refuge offers an unparalleled opportunity to educate children of all ages and adults about the importance of preserving Long Island Sound, our environment, and our maritime heritage.

Cider, Cookies and Shopping @ Fairfield Museum and History Center

This weekend, the Fairfield Museum and History Center located on Beach Street is offering several exciting promotions. On Saturday, November 30 they are celebrating small business Saturday by offering a card special.  Folks visiting the museum gift shop, which is chock full of goodies who purchase five packs of cards by Onion Hill by Kassie Foss will get one free! 

The fun ramps up on Sunday, December 1 when the museum store will give visitors a reusable Fairfield Museum shopping bag and a limited edition Woodberry pewter ornament with every purchase while supplies last. 

To add to the festivities, the Fairfield Museum and History Center is offering free cookies and cider all weekend long. The shop is located at 370 Beach Street and is open from 10 am to 4 pm with plenty of on-site parking.  Another perk is that the museum never charged sales tax! 

Save the date for the Holiday Express Train opening night on December 6 from 5 pm to 8 pm that is kicked off with the tree lighting on the Fairfield Green. The hours for the Holiday Express Train are Monday – Thursday 10am – 1pm, Special Friday Evening Hours: 10am – 7pm, Saturdays & Sundays: 10am – 4pm, December 23, 24, 26, 30 and 31: 10am – 4pm, Closed Christmas Day and New Year’s Day