Oysters, Pearls of Long Island Sound at the Bruce Museum

Found in estuaries around the world, oysters play a significant role in ecosystems and economies. These bivalve mollusks have sustained Native Americans and created waterside cultures. The Long Island Sound’s native oyster, the Eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica), is a keystone species in the local environment, providing critical habitat and food for many other species, recycling nutrients, cleaning the water as it feeds, and driving an industry. Its value lies in these worthy attributes rather than in its potential for jewels. Like other true oysters, the Eastern oyster rarely produces a pearl. If it does make one, the pearl lacks the lustrous quality of those produced by pearl oysters, which are in a different family.

Eastern Oyster Eastern Oyster Crassostrea virginica Bruce Museum Collection Photo by Paul Mutino
Eastern Oyster
Eastern Oyster
Crassostrea virginica
Bruce Museum Collection Photo by Paul Mutino

The Bruce Museum celebrates the Eastern oyster in the exhibition Oysters, Pearls of Long Island Sound, running through March 23, 2014.

The exhibition will explore the science and history of the Eastern oyster in Long Island Sound, examining how its nutritional and commercial values have made the Eastern oyster a popular commodity for residents along the Sound for eons.

Hassam_Sloop Childe Hassam (American, 1859 – 1935) Oyster Sloop, Cos Cob, 1902 Oil on canvas National Gallery of Art, Washington, Ailsa Mellon Bruce Collection, 1970.17.100
Hassam_Sloop
Childe Hassam (American, 1859 – 1935) Oyster Sloop, Cos Cob, 1902
Oil on canvas
National Gallery of Art, Washington, Ailsa Mellon Bruce Collection, 1970.17.100

Native Americans harvested oysters from mile-long natural beds and collected individual oysters that were up to a foot long. By the early 1800s, the natural beds had become depleted and oysters were cultivated on artificial beds.

The oyster industry was a powerful force in the local economy by the end of the 19th century. However, overfishing, pollution, natural disasters, and disease brought about a decline and the industry was seriously threatened through the early to mid-20th century.

In recent years, the oyster trade has experienced resurgence as a result of improved aquaculture techniques and oysters’ popularity among food connoisseurs who enjoy their distinctive flavor, which varies with each local environment.

Organized with the assistance of scientists and historians and developed in cooperation with the Town of Greenwich Shellfish Commission, Oysters, Pearls of Long Island Sound features hands-on, interactive displays, videos, specimens of bivalves from around the world, and historical objects that appeal to all ages. Objects from the Bruce Museum collection are supplemented by loans of shells, oystering tools, food-related items, and boat models from local collectors including oysterman Norm Bloom and institutions such as the Yale Peabody Museum, Rowayton Historical Society, National Gallery of Art, Grand Central Oyster Bar, and Northeast Fisheries Science Center’s Milford Laboratory.

Complementing the exhibition will be a science lecture series in the fall and a history lecture series in the winter in addition to a variety of programs suitable for all ages.

About the Bruce Museum

Explore Art and Science at the Bruce Museum, located at One Museum Drive in Greenwich, Connecticut. The Museum is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10 am to 5 pm and Sunday from 1 pm to 5 pm; closed Mondays and major holidays. Admission is $7 for adults, $6 for students up to 22 years, $6 for seniors and free for members and children under 5 years. Individual admission is free on Tuesday. Free on-site parking is available and the Museum is accessible to individuals with disabilities. For additional information, call the Bruce Museum at (203) 869-0376 or visit the website at www.brucemuseum.org. For area information www.visitfairfieldcountyct.com

Inside the Artists’ Studios: Small-Scale Views at the Bruce Museum in Greenwich CT

If you have ever wished you could observe artists engaged in the process of creation, Inside the Artists’ Studios presented by the Bruce Museum on One Museum Drive in Greenwich allows you to explore the individual investigations and analyses of four artists through their paintings, prints, photographs and three-dimensional miniature constructions. This exhibit runs through March 9 and features a Guide-by-Cell Audio Tour that is free of charge and may be accessed simply by using your cell phone.

The artists participating are well known and bring special skills to this exhibit.

Perspective Box Jimmy Sanders (American, b. 1963) Perspective Box, 2007 Wood, oil paint, 28 x 36 x 28 in. New Britain Museum of American Art, New Britain, CT Photo courtesy of Hirschl & Adler Modern, New York
Perspective Box
Jimmy Sanders (American, b. 1963) Perspective Box, 2007
Wood, oil paint, 28 x 36 x 28 in.
New Britain Museum of American Art, New Britain, CT Photo courtesy of Hirschl & Adler Modern, New York

Jimmy Sanders, for example has been influenced by the work of 17th-century Dutch painters, most notably in his Perspective Box, Studio in Florence, which he modeled after his own Florentine studio. Sanders traveled in Europe in the late ‘90s and, after seeing Hoogstraten’s A Peepshow with Views of the Interior of a Dutch House (c. 1655-60; The National Gallery, London), was inspired to create a contemporary version of this Old Master creation.

Lori Nix Studio Lori Nix (American, b. 1969) Lori Nix Studio, 2013 Chromogenic print, 42 x 69 in. Courtesy of the Artist © Lori Nix
Lori Nix Studio
Lori Nix (American, b. 1969) Lori Nix Studio, 2013 Chromogenic print, 42 x 69 in. Courtesy of the Artist
© Lori Nix

Describing herself as a “non-traditional photographer,” Lori Nix constructs her sets and then photographs them. After photographing the “scene” she has laboriously
constructed, Nix dismantles the diorama, leaving the photograph as the ultimate creative object. Her latest project is a self-reflective examination of her own crowded living/work space.

The Art of Painting Richard Haas (American, b. 1936) The Art of Painting a.k.a.The Allegory of Painting, 1968-69 Wood, cardboard, cloth, paper, acrylic, pencil, masonite, lights, 221/2 x221/2x221/2in. Courtesy of the Artist Art © Richard Haas/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY
The Art of Painting
Richard Haas (American, b. 1936)
The Art of Painting a.k.a.The Allegory of Painting, 1968-69 Wood, cardboard, cloth, paper, acrylic, pencil, masonite, lights, 221/2 x221/2×221/2in.
Courtesy of the Artist
Art © Richard Haas/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

Richard Haas began exploring the artist’s studio environment in the 1960s. He started with iconic masters, then moved into creating dioramic boxes of his contemporaries’ studios – including Jackson Pollock and Franz Kline – as well as views from his own 12-foot studio windows in New York’s then-gritty and industrial SoHo.

ack the Dripper Joe Fig (American, b. 1968) Jack the Dripper, 2006 Cibachrome print, Ed. of 10, 16 x 20 in. Courtesy of the Artist and the Tierney Gardarin Gallery, New York
ack the Dripper
Joe Fig (American, b. 1968)
Jack the Dripper, 2006
Cibachrome print, Ed. of 10, 16 x 20 in.
Courtesy of the Artist and the Tierney Gardarin Gallery, New York

Examinations of artists’ working lives also inform the pieces created by Joe Fig. Like Haas, Fig moved to the representation of contemporary artists’ spaces, interviewing artists before recreating their studios in miniature. Fig’s intimate views clearly appeal to the viewer’s desire to sneak a peek into the artistic process of artists such as Chuck Close, Ross Bleckner, Eric Fischl, April Gornik, Bill Jensen, Ryan McGinness, Philip Pearlstein, James Siena and Joan Snyder.

About the Bruce Museum: Explore Art and Science at the Bruce Museum, located at One Museum Drive in Greenwich, Connecticut. The Museum is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10 am to 5 pm and Sunday from 1 pm to 5 pm; closed Mondays and major holidays. Admission is $7 for adults, $6 for students up to 22 years, $6 for seniors and free for members and children under 5 years. Individual admission is free on Tuesday. Free on-site parking is available and the Museum is accessible to individuals with disabilities. For additional information, call the Bruce Museum at (203) 869-0376 or visit the website at www.brucemuseum.org. For area information www.visitfairfieldcountyct.com

Closer: The Graphic Art of Chuck Close at The Bruce Museum

The Bruce Museum in Greenwich is presenting Closer: The Graphic Art of Chuck Close in the main Love, Newman Wild Galleries through January 5, 2013 with a portion on view in the Lecture Gallery through January 26.

With a body of work composed almost entirely of portraits, the American artist Chuck Close has been astounding us with his artistic verisimilitude for more than four decades. His prints, especially, are adventures in problem solving: working from the particularities of each print medium – woodcut, etching, silkscreen, linocut, aquatint, pulp-paper multiple – he gives his imagination free rein to reconceive their aesthetic possibilities. Although a spirit of experimentation characterizes Close’s work across all media, it is particularly evident in the wide-ranging scope of his printed production.

Chuck Close announced his arrival on the contemporary art scene with his large-scale, black-and-white airbrushed heads, paintings based on photographs he had transferred to canvas by means of a grid. Recognition came quickly: his work was shown at the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, in 1969, followed by a solo exhibition at New York’s Bykert Gallery in 1970 and a one-man show at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art in 1971. In 1972 he created the first print of his professional career, a mezzotint, which began a life-long engagement with the aesthetics and technology of printmaking. The collaborative nature of this work has been vital to the artist’s creative process: working with master printers, Close alters one or several variables to create endless permutations in a wide variety of print techniques, usually recycling past portraits of himself, his family, and his friends.

The Bruce Museum is also sponsoring a lecture on Dec. 12 beginning at 7:30 p.m. It is titled Closer: The Art of Chuck Close in the Context of the 1970s that is being led by Kenneth Silver, PHD, Professor of Art History, New York University, Adjunct Curator of Art, Bruce Museum. There will be a dessert reception for both lectures from 6:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. and reservations are required. Visit www.brucemuseum.org to make reservations.

Closer: The Graphic Art of Chuck Close is accompanied by a generously illustrated catalogue by the same title. A lecture series and film series will also complement the exhibition.

About the Bruce Museum
Explore Art and Science at the Bruce Museum, located at One Museum Drive in Greenwich, Connecticut. The Museum is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10 am to 5 pm and Sunday from 1 pm to 5 pm; closed Mondays and major holidays. Admission is $7 for adults, $6 for students up to 22 years, $6 for seniors and free for members and children under 5 years. Individual admission is free on Tuesday. Free on-site parking is available and the Museum is accessible to individuals with disabilities. For additional information, call the Bruce Museum at 203 869-0376 or visit the website at www.brucemuseum.org.

Get Real at the Bruce Museum

Martin Lewis (American, 1881-1962) Above the Yards, Weehawken, 1918 Aquatint and etching, 17 ½ x 23 ¼” Collection of Dr. Dorrance T. Kelly ©Estate of Martin Lewis
Martin Lewis (American, 1881-1962)
Above the Yards, Weehawken, 1918
Aquatint and etching, 17 ½ x 23 ¼”
Collection of Dr. Dorrance T. Kelly
©Estate of Martin Lewis

Highlighting the work of nine American artists who at the beginning of the twentieth century were inspired by the world around them to realistically depict everyday scenes, the Bruce Museum presents the new exhibition Telling American History: Realism from the Print Collection of Dr. Dorrance T. Kelly from August 31 through December 1, 2013.

The show features more than 40 original fine art prints including lithographs and etchings that chronicle daily life – the bustle of urban streets, boisterous moments of leisure, modern modes of transportation, and bucolic rural images – by leading artists who approached their subject matter through the lens of realism: George Bellows (1882-1925), Thomas Hart Benton (1889-1975), Edward Hopper (1882-1967), Martin Lewis (1881-1962), Reginald Marsh (1898-1954), John Sloan (1871-1951), Benton Murdoch Spruance (1904-1967), Stow Wengenroth (1906-1978), and Grant Wood (1891-1942).

The artworks present visitors with a snapshot of America from 1905 through 1967. Each print featured in the exhibition was chosen for its subject matter and artistic merit and placed together they present windows into scenes of America’s past. Set amid a backdrop of events such as World War I, the Great Depression, New Deal programs, and World War II, the country was experiencing changes in its cultural, geographic, and demographic nature. The nation experienced a great upheaval as citizens and immigrants alike flocked to urban areas in hopes of greater economic prospects. At the same time, advances in technology and transportation were transforming rural regions.

Wengenroth_Grand Central Stow Wengenroth (American, 1906-1978) Grand Central, 1949 Lithograph, 8 ½ x 15 ¾” Collection of Dr. Dorrance T. Kelly
Wengenroth_Grand Central
Stow Wengenroth (American, 1906-1978)
Grand Central, 1949
Lithograph, 8 ½ x 15 ¾”
Collection of Dr. Dorrance T. Kelly

Drawn from different areas of the country, the artists shared a similar goal of creating artwork that was available to all. They embraced realism, using it to capture images of modern American society as it quickly changed around them. This distinguished their work from the traditional, idealized and romanticized work of European art. By illustrating everyday scenes, the artists featured in this show created connections for the average American and invited them to become part of the artistic dialog,because their images appealed through accessible subject matter and to the pocketbook of the everyday person.

A fully illustrated catalogue of the show will be available in the Bruce Museum Store. A series of public programs will be offered to complement the show, including Monday morning lectures, hands-on printmaking workshops for adults and students, a program for families with toddlers and one for seniors suffering from memory loss, as well as school tours.

Lewis_Misty Night Martin Lewis (American, 1881-1962) Misty Night, Danbury, 1947 Lithograph,11 x 15 ¼” Collection of Dr. Dorrance T. Kelly ©Estate of Martin Lewis
Lewis_Misty Night
Martin Lewis (American, 1881-1962)
Misty Night, Danbury, 1947
Lithograph,11 x 15 ¼”
Collection of Dr. Dorrance T. Kelly
©Estate of Martin Lewis

About the Bruce Museum
Explore Art and Science at the Bruce Museum, located at One Museum Drive in Greenwich, Connecticut. The Museum is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10 am to 5 pm and Sunday from 1 pm to 5 pm; closed Mondays and major holidays. Admission is $7 for adults, $6 for students up to 22 years, $6 for seniors and free for members and children under 5 years. Individual admission is free on Tuesday. Free on-site parking is available and the Museum is accessible to individuals with disabilities. For additional information, call the Bruce Museum at (203) 869-0376 or visit the website at www.brucemuseum.org.

For area information www.visitfairfieldcountyct.com

Bruce Museum features Durer, Rembrandt and Whistler

Joachim and the Angel ca. 1504 Albrecht Dürer (German, 1471-1528) Joachim and the Angel, ca. 1504 Woodcut From The Life of the Virgin Collection of Dr. Dorrance T. Kelly
Joachim and the Angel ca. 1504
Albrecht Dürer (German, 1471-1528) Joachim and the Angel, ca. 1504 Woodcut From The Life of the Virgin Collection of Dr. Dorrance T. Kelly

Located in Fairfield County Connecticut, the Bruce Museum located on One Museum Dr. in Greenwich is featuring prints of old masters and works from the 19th century through August 18th. This is one of the most distinguished local collections of prints that have been painstakingly assembled by Dr. Dorrance T. Kelly. The works include prints of Durer, Rembrandt and Whistler among other notable artists.

While Dr. Kelly’s collection has been comprised primarily of American 20th-century prints and prints by John James Audubon, in recent years he has also collected Old Master and 19th-century works extensively.

The Triumph of Mordecai Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn (Dutch, 1606-1669) The Triumph of Mordecai, ca. 1641 Etching and drypoint Collection of Dr. Dorrance T. Kelly
The Triumph of Mordecai
Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn (Dutch, 1606-1669) The Triumph of Mordecai, ca. 1641 Etching and drypoint Collection of Dr. Dorrance T. Kelly

These encompass splendid sheets by the great German printmaker Albrecht Dürer, including a rare etching, woodcuts, and engravings of such iconic images as his Nemesis of 1502.

Dr. Kelly’s Dutch prints include several of the rare engravings after the influential Adam Elsheimer by Hendrik Goudt and no less than 28 images by the highly experimental printmaker Rembrandt van Rijn, ranging from early works of the 1630s to mature impressions from the 1650s.

Limehouse James Abbott McNeill Whistler (American, 1834-1903) Limehouse, 1859 Etching, printed in black on laid paper From “The Thames Set” Collection of Dr. Dorrance T. Kelly
Limehouse
James Abbott McNeill Whistler (American, 1834-1903) Limehouse, 1859 Etching, printed in black on laid paper From “The Thames Set” Collection of Dr. Dorrance T. Kelly

Dr. Kelly’s 18th-century holdings include sheets by the great Italian artists Canaletto and Giovanni Domenico Tiepolo and several fine sheets from Los Caprichos by the renowned Spanish artist Francisco de Goya y Lucientes.

Completing the collection is a group of etched cityscapes and figure studies by the American artist James Abbott McNeill Whistler.

Together the collection attests to the quality of some of the greatest printmakers in Western Art.

The exhibition – on view through August 18, 2013 and is accompanied by a scholarly catalog and a series of educational and public programs.

The Bruce Museum is grateful to Dr. Dorrance T. Kelly for sharing this extraordinary collection with the public.

About the Bruce Museum: Explore Art and Science at the Bruce Museum, located at One Museum Drive in Greenwich, Connecticut. The Museum is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10 am to 5 pm and Sunday from 1 pm to 5 pm; closed Mondays and major holidays. Admission is $7 for adults, $6 for students up to 22 years, $6 for seniors and free for members and children under 5 years. Individual admission is free on Tuesday. Free on-site parking is available and the Museum is accessible to individuals with disabilities. For additional information, call the Bruce Museum at (203) 869-0376 or visit the website at www.brucemuseum.org. For area information on Fairfield County www.visitfairfieldcountyct.com.

Mother’s Day Ideas for Litchfield Hills and Fairfield County

Mothers Day is a holiday celebrating mothers and motherhood that was first celebrated in 1908, when Anna Jarvis held a memorial for her mother in West Virginia. She then went on a campaign to make it a recognized holiday in the US and was successful in establishing it in 1914. Today, Mother’s Day is celebrated around the world.

A perfect treat for moms is going to the theater. Several theaters in Litchfield Hills and Fairfield County are offering specials just for mom.

Downtown Cabaret Theatre
Downtown Cabaret Theatre

The Downtown Cabaret Theatre (http://dtcab.com) for example located on 263 Golden Hill Street in Bridgeport is offering a free ticket for mom to a special performance now through May 12th of 8-Track or Wizard of Odds, or both shows! For details call the Box Office 203-576-1636 (Offer not available online).

Westport Country Playhouse
Westport Country Playhouse

In the heart of Westport located in a state of the theater, the Westport Country Playhouse on 25 Powers Court in Westport is offering a complimentary glass of Prosecco on Mother’s Day, Sunday, May 12, before the 3 p.m. matinee performance of The Dining Room, a witty and heartfelt story of the American family and its vanishing traditions, directed by Mark Lamos. For tickets and more information visit www.westportplayhouse.org or call the box office at 203.227.4177.

Infinity Hall
Infinity Hall

In the unspoiled village of Norfolk in the Litchfield Hills, Infinity Hall on 20 Greenwoods Road (Rte. 44) is offering a 5-star brunch, lunch or dinner for mom with the chef serving delicious specials as well as all the items from their popular menu. To make the day memorable Infinity Hall is hosting a 2 p.m. matinee featuring Brian Miller, Musician, Magician and Mind Reader and a 7:30 p.m. concert starring country singer Iris DeMent. Please note that show tickets will be sold separately. Visit http://www.InfinityHall.com or call 860-542-5531 for reservations and tickets.

Landmarks Theatre
Landmarks Theatre

In Thomaston, on Main Street, in the historic Thomaston Opera House, Landmarks Theatre (www.landmarkcommunitytheatre.org) is offering a buy one ticket at the regular admission price of $23 and get one ticket free for mom on May 10 -12 for Mother’s Day. The Landmarks Theatre spring musical production, sure to delight mom is Guys & Dolls. Shows on May 10 and 11 are at 8 p.m. and at 2 p.m. on May 12. Get your tickets by calling the Box Office (860) 283-6250 or go online http://www.landmarkcommunitytheatre.org. Don’t miss this much-loved Broadway musical!

Another idea is to give a gift of music to your mom by attending the Waterbury Symphony Orchestra’s multi media experience of Gustav Mahler’s Titan. “The World According to Gustav,” is a biographical examination of the composer’s life featuring excerpts from Das Klagende Lied and Songs of a Wayfarer. The second half of the concert will be Symphony no. 1 (Titan). This musical evening for moms takes place on Saturday, May 11 at 8 p.m. at the NVCC Fine Arts Center in Waterbury at a discounted price of $24 for moms on $30 seats. Tickets are available online at: http://www.waterburysymphony.org (For discount, type in the word “mother” when asked for discount code) or by calling 203-574-4283.

Special Treats

Bruce Museum
Bruce Museum

For Mother’s Day, the Bruce Museum Store (http://brucemuseum.org) located in Greenwich and featured in the March 2013 issue of Connecticut Magazine as ‘Best Boutique’ among museum shops – has a wonderful selection of gifts that are perfect for every mom including cards, candles, scarves, hats, stationery, books, accessories, collectibles and jewelry. Just in time for Mother’s Day, the Bruce Museum Store is offering 25% off on all jewelry for the entire month of May in celebration of Mom. The Museum is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.; closed Mondays and major holidays. Admission is $7 for adults, $6 for students up to 22 years, $6 for seniors and free for members and children under 5 years. Individual admission is free on Tuesday. Free on-site parking is available and the Museum is accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Stepping Stones Museum for Children
Stepping Stones Museum for Children

In Norwalk, Mom’s will enjoy free admission on Sunday, May 12 to the Stepping Stones Museum for Children (www.steppingstonesmuseum.org) located in Mathews Park, 303 West Avenue. Stepping Stones Museum for Children is an award-winning, private, non -profit 501(c)(3) children’s museum committed to broadening and enriching the lives of children and families. Located on five acres in Mathews Park, the recently expanded LEED Gold certified museum encompasses five hands-on galleries, a state-of-the-art multimedia theater, Family and Teacher Resource Center, cafe and retail store. Museum hours are Monday-Sunday from 10 am-5 pm. Admission is $15 for adults and children and $10 for seniors. Children under 1 are free. To learn more visit steppingstonesmuseum.org or call 203 899 0606.

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Also in Norwalk, the Gift Shop at the Maritime Aquarium at Norwalk (www.maritimeaquarium.org) on Water Street is offering 25% off sale in their gift shop on fine jewelry by local artists May 10 – 12 only. When visiting the Aquarium don’t miss the special exhibit of the meerkats that scamper and play endlessly. The museum is open 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. daily.

girls_in_sf-_small

The Imagination Nation in Bristol (www.imaginemuseum.org) on 1 Pleasant Street is offering mom’s free admission on Sunday, May 12 from 12 noon to 5 p.m. Kids can craft a fabric flower in the Imagine That! art area to give to mom as a wonderful keepsake for her special day. Admission is $7 per person, children under 1 are always free and mom’s on Mother’s Day!

American Clock and Watch Museum
American Clock and Watch Museum

If you have “time” on mother’s day, head to Bristol’s American Clock & Watch Museum where all moms will be celebrated by receiving free admission! This museum is filled with a collection of exquisite timepieces that tell the story of the state and region’s rich clock making heritage. While visiting the museum don’t miss, the special 2013 exhibit “Art Deco Timepieces: Treasures of the Jazz Age”. The museum is located at 100 Maple Street, in Bristol. For more information call the museum 860-583-6070 http://www.clockandwatchmuseum.org.

New England Carousel Museum
New England Carousel Museum

At the New England Carousel Museum on 95 Riverside Ave. in Bristol, mother’s accompanied by kids pay half price all day. During the Golden Age of the carousel, postcards were very popular. Visitors to the museum are invited to print a postcard to give to mom as a memorable remembrance and to come for a ride on the carousel! For more information visit http://www.thecarouselmuseum.org.

Beardsley Zoo
Beardsley Zoo

On May 12 bring mom to the zoo… Beardsley Zoo that is in Bridgeport on 1875 Noble Ave. The ticket is on the Zoo – moms get in free because Connecticut’s only zoo wants to thank all moms working so hard throughout the year on their special day. Enjoy this special day visiting their animals or having lunch in the Peacock Pavilion. When visiting don’t miss the newest mom at the Zoo, Cupcake, the Nigerian Dwarf goat that just gave birth to two kids! http://www.BeardsleyZoo.org.

Lake Compounce
Lake Compounce

Opening day for Lake Compounce Theme Park (www.lakecompounce.com/) is Saturday, May 11th. On Sunday May 12th, moms will enjoy a little extra special attention in honor of Mother’s Day. Buy one, get one free tickets are available online only for the entire weekend, so mom can enjoy a free day in the park when she comes with anyone else who pays regular adult admission. In addition, moms get to enjoy a special ‘Relaxation Station’ for their comfort and pampering.

Winvian
Winvian

Winvian (www.winvian.com) in Morris Connecticut is offering a Mother’s Day Brunch from 12:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. Winvian’s garden is the centerpiece of Chef Eddy’s fresh and spontaneous restaurant offerings that will be a special treat from moms. The brunch is a three course prix-fixe menu at $90 per person, tax and tip is additional, reservations requested.

Terston, Kent
Terston, Kent

The week of May 6th-12th Terston (www.terston.com/) on Rte. 7 in Kent and the David Gavin Salon will offer a special in recognition of Mother’s Day. Make a clothing purchase of $50 to receive a free specially selected scarf. (one per customer while supplies last). In addition, Terston customers can experience an introduction to the David Gavin Salon expertise – Carissa and Jennifer will be available for complimentary quick consults for customers visiting the store. When booking an appointment, for a future date, new clients to the salon will receive 20% off a hair cut and/or color. In addition, all David Gavin luxurious and nourishing hair products will be 10% off for the week. Terston is located on 27 North Main Street in Kent CT.