6th Annual Watertown CT House Tour Saturday September 24th

The 6th Annual Watertown House Tour will take place on Saturday September 24th from 11am to 3pm, rain or shine. Five fabulous homes will be featured in this year’s tour including The Hickcox House at 235 Main Street, The Woodward House at 126 North Street, The Long House at 241 Woodbury Road, The Guernsey Davis House at 141 Merriam Lane, and Trillium at 2579 Litchfield Road. The Watertown Historical Society Museum and the Nova Scotia Schoolhouse at 22 DeForest Street will also be open for viewing.

The Watertown House Tour is a benefit for the Watertown Historical Society Museum. The Watertown Historical Society is a private, nonprofit, all volunteer organization dedicated to collecting, preserving, and sharing Watertown and Oakville’s history through the Museum.

Advance tickets are $25 per person, and will be $30 the day of the tour. Tickets for this self-guided house tour are non-refundable & can be purchased by mailing a check or money order to: Watertown House Tour, c/o 107 Vaill Road, Watertown, CT 06795.Checks should be made payable to the “Watertown Historical Society”. Tickets can also be purchased online with a credit card at: http://www.watertownhistoricalsociety.org

All tickets and maps will be mailed to those that purchase advance tickets, starting at the beginning of September. Advance orders must be received no later than Friday September 16th. Requests for tickets after this date will be held for pick-up on the day of the tour at the Museum.

Tickets will soon be available at the beginning of September at the following retail locations: LaBonne’s Market in Watertown, Chubba’s, the Health Complex, The Watertown and Oakville Libraries, Hosking’s Nursery, Depot Square Farm Shoppe, Jimmy’s of Watertown and at the Watertown Fall Festival.

On the day of the tour tickets will be available at all of the businesses, all of the houses and at the Museum, which will be tour headquarters. Call the Museum at 860-274-1050 or view http://www.watertownhistoricalsociety.org for more information.

Roxbury Race for Open Space Set for September 17


A 5K “Race for Open Space” will be held in Roxbury on Saturday, September 17, starting at the River Road Preserve on River Road at 8:30 a.m.

Co-sponsored by the Roxbury Land Trust and Roxbury Road Race Series, the race is open to all ages for walking or running. Registration is $5 per person, with children under 10 free.

The race will benefit the stonewall restoration project at the Mine Hill Preserve that was completed this summer.

Work at the historic 19th century iron ore mining complex, which is on the National Register of Historic Places, encompassed reconstruction of massive stonewalls in five areas, as well as much-needed drainage improvements.

The Roxbury Land Trust has preserved 3,400 acres of farmland, woodlands, wildlife habitats, watercourses, wetlands and open space in Roxbury and neighboring communities since it was established in 1970.

The non-profit organization, which is governed by a volunteer board of directors and is supported by membership dues and charitable contributions, now maintains 32 preserves with 30 miles of hiking trails and three active farms, as well as offers a wide range of educational programs.

For more information, visit http://www.roxburylandtrust.org or call 860-350-4148.

The Taste of Greater Danbury Connecticut Sept. 10-11

Danbury has always been a place about community and nowhere can the community celebrate with all its citizens, friends and visitors better than downtown. Nothing proves this more than the long awaited popular Taste of Danbury that begins on Saturday, September 10 and ends on Sunday, September 11. In it’s 11th year, the Taste of Danbury promises more food, more fun for the entire family and more music than ever before! This is an event that is not to be missed.

On Saturday, September 10th, the Taste is kicked off with the Regional Y Kid’s Run at 10 am. That is followed by the 3rd Annual Run for Children at 10:30; the Regional Y Awards will be at 12:30 PM. The Official Opening Ceremony and the Walk of Honor takes place from 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM. From 1:30 to 2:30 participants will enjoy the YMCA Family Zumba. At 2:45 PM – 3:30 PM Taste goers will enjoy Sherry Winston and at 3:45 PM – 5:00 PM the Quadrasaurus take over. At 5:30, Kicks 105.5 Country Showdown Winner, Bobby Kendall will perform. He is followed by Pete Herger and Friends from 6:45 PM – 7:30 PM. From 8:00 PM to 10 PM taking front and center stage is Bad Company’s former lead singer Brian Howe, the Taste’s premier act.

On Sunday, September 11th the day begins at 11:00 AM with the News Times Community Parade on Rose Street to Boughton Street. The Parade is followed by DJ music from noon until 12:45. Afternoon entertainment includes: Golden Angels Jazz Band from 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM; Bad Company’s Former Lead Singer Brian Howe from 2:00 PM – 4:00 PM; Tracey DeLucia and Band from 4:30 PM – 5:15 PM; and In Harmony from 5:30 PM to 7:00 PM.

The Taste of course is not all about music and entertainment – it is also about Food! This year’s variety of foods include: ceviche, hornados, empanadas, patacones, bubble milk tea, thai fried rice, pad thai, spring rolls, lobster rolls, philly cheese steak sliders, New England clam chowder, cubano sandwiches, bbq chicken, tostones, sausage and peppers, rice balls, stuffed breads, pretzels, pizza, ziti, stuffed eggplant, fried dough, pork and beef shish kebabs, ice cream, hamburger, hotdogs, fajitas, kielbasa, bratwurst, paninis, baked goods, cookies, cotton candy, Italian ice, and specialty sodas

Participating area restaurants include: El Sabor, Thai Awesome, The Blue Dog, Teddy’s at the Holiday Inn, Primo’s Deli, Roma’s Deli, Nick’s Restaurant, Romy’s BBQ, Sprinkles Ice Cream, Two Steps Downtown Grille, Fajita Joes, Curro’s, Mysore, Weenie Lynn’s, Bruegger’s Bagels, Stony Hill Bakery, and O’Delli’s Catering.

For up to the minute information check out http://www.citycenterdanbury.com.

Silo Cooking School Introduces “Second Thursdays: Literary Lunches” A Culinary Book Club Sept. 8, Oct. 13 & Nov. 10


What could be better than this new series at The Silo Cooking School that joins two passions – reading and eating?

Cooking School Director Chef Mary Kravec and Book Maven Lauren Daniels combine a book discussion with a hands-on cooking class and lunch on the second Thursday of the month, beginning September 8. Lauren, a long-time Silo Cooking School volunteer, is a short story author and humor guest columnist for local newspapers, and the former manager of Walden Books and Borders in Southbury.

Recipes for Romance!

Thursday, September 8, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Book Discussion: Lunch in Paris by Elizabeth Bard.

Menu: Wild Mushroom Turnovers, Goat Cheese Salad with Figs, Fruit Yogurt Cake.

A Menu for Magic

Thursday, October 13, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Book Discussion: Garden Spells by Sarah Addison Allen.

Menu: Apple Fennel Salad, Calendula Biscuits, Herbed Swiss Chard Souffles, Mini Pound Cakes with Blueberry Lavender Syrup.

The Power of Food and Companionship

Thursday, November 10, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Book Discussion: The School of Essential Ingredients by Erica Bauermeister. Menu: Sherry-Soaked Cranberry-Stuffed Pancetta-Wrapped Turkey Scalloppines, Butternut Squash Risotto, Carl’s White Cake.

$30 per session. Registration required.

Programs are held at Hunt Hill Farm, 44 Upland Road, New Miford, CT. For more information and to register visit http://www.hunthillfarmtrust.org, or call (860) 355-0300. Registration is also available at The Silo during regular business hours. The Silo Gallery and store are open Wednesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday from noon to 5 p.m.

Drawing on the creative legacy of Skitch and Ruth Henderson, the Henderson Cultural Center at Hunt Hill Farm, a Smithsonian Institution affiliate, is a vibrant and unique regional resource, offering the public opportunities to explore music, art, cuisine, and permanently protected historic open space.

16th Annual Colonial Fair at Woodbury CT’s Glebe House Sept. 18

Woodbury, whose name means a dwelling place in the woods was settled by 17 colonists in 1659 making it one of Connecticut’s oldest western inland towns. In 1673, Woodbury was purchased from Chief Pomperaug of the Pootatuck Indians. The present day Main Street (Rte. 6) was laid out in the 1670’s along an old Indian trail where Chief Pomperaug is buried.

Woodbury was always a prosperous town. By the end of the 18th century, it was a thriving center of agricultural trade. In the early 19th century, industrial growth led to a building boom and many of the houses and four of the five churches along Rte. 6 date from this period.

One of Woodbury’s architectural gems is The Glebe House Museum & Gertrude Jekyll Garden dating from the 1740’s. The Glebe House became a minister’s farm or glebe for Woodbury’s first Episcopal minister, John Rutgers Marshall. Only weeks after American Independence was secure, a group of clergy met secretly at the Glebe House, to elect the Reverend Dr. Samuel Seabury as the first Bishop in the new nation, a decision that assumed the separation of church and state, and religious tolerance in the new nation. This event established the Glebe House as the birthplace of the Episcopal Church in America.

On September 18th the Glebe House is gearing up for its 16th annual Colonial Fair & Muster Day in the Hollow on Sunday, September 18 from 1:00-5:00.

The Pisgah Mountain Primitives will return to demonstrate blacksmithing, rope making and colonial cooking. Other colonial craft demonstrations will include spinning, quilting, wood working and basket making.

Children will have the chance to make candles, practice quill writing and churn butter. Colonial stories will be told by professional storyteller Joyce Marie Rayno and Sandi Eustace from Double D Pony will hitch up Dixie and Diego to their cart for pony rides.

The museum has special tours planned along with food, music and much more colonial era fun for the entire family. The Fair is free for children under 18 and $5 for adults.

A Riddle Wrapped In a Mystery at The Sherman Playhouse Sept. 9 – Oct. 1

The Sherman Playhouse will debut the classic mystery-drama, AN INSPECTOR CALLS, by J.B. Priestly on Friday, September 9 at 8:00 p.m. The play is scheduled for a four-week run.

AN INSPECTOR CALLS takes place in 1912 in an English industrial city, where a young girl commits suicide and an eminently respectable British family is subject to a routine inquiry in connection with the death. An inspector calls to interrogate the family, and during the course of his questioning, all members of the group are implicated lightly or deeply in the girl’s undoing. The family, closely knit and friendly at the beginning of the evening, is shown up quite differently by the night’s end in the play’s strange and mysterious conclusion.

“When the play is set, prior to World War I, big business and the upper-class – represented by the Birling family – run the world’s mightiest empire,” said director Laura Gilbert of New Milford. “And then the mysterious ‘Inspector’ shows up, a working-class girl is found dead, and that’s when the mysterious questions arise: Is the girl in all the characters’ confessions the same girl? Is there in fact a dead girl at all? And is the inspector really a policeman? The play just keeps you guessing.”

“The play is brilliant because it’s a political statement disguised as a melodramatic thriller,” said producer Katherine Almquist of Sharon, who also portrays Mrs. Sybil Birling. “The play opened in Moscow in 1945 at the end of World War II. And [playwright] Priestly was an avowed socialist. So there is definite social commentary here, but first and foremost it’s a classic drama that provokes audiences to leave the theater talking, and even more importantly, questioning.”

Along with Almquist, the cast features some of the region’s finest actors: David Fejes (New Fairfield), Quinn Uniacke (Sherman), Ben Grinberg (New Preston), Heather Mock (Danbury), and Robin Frome and Alex Echeverria (both New Milford).

In addition to producer/performer Almquist and director Gilbert (who also designed the set), the show’s crew includes lighting designer Peter Petrino, costumer Terry Hawley, and stage manager David Almquist.

AN INSPECTOR CALLS was first performed in 1945 in two Moscow theatres. The play had its first English production in 1946 at the New Theatre in London starring a young Alec Guinness. The play opened on Broadway at the Booth Theatre on October 21, 1947 and was also adapted into a 1954 film starring Alastair Sim as Inspector Goole. Variety called Priestly’s work “An engaging play…Its mood is sustained throughout, so that it is practically always interesting.”

AN INSPECTOR CALLS runs September 9,10 16,17,18 23,24 30 and October 1. Curtain time is 8:00 p.m. Fridays & Saturdays, with a 2:00 p.m. Sunday matinee on September 18. Tickets for all shows are $20 for general seating.

On Thursday, September 8, all patrons are invited to attend a “Half-Price Preview Night” at 8:00 p.m. where all tickets are only $10. Students may see any performance for only $10 if they pay in cash only at the door and carry a valid student ID. Students may not make reservations in advance for a performance. On September 9, an opening night party will be held after the show, complete with wine and hors d’oeuvres.

Reservations can be made online at http://www.shermanplayers.org or by calling the box office at (860) 354-3622. The Sherman Playhouse now accepts credit card payments both online and at the door.

The Sherman Playhouse is a local, non-Equity theatre company located on 5 Route 39 North (next to the firehouse) in Sherman, Conn.