This Father’s Day Take Dad on an Adventure to 1518! Wigwam Escape @ Institute for American Indian Studies

This Father’s Day it is time to celebrate your one-of-a-kind dad in an unexpected and fun way that he will cherish for years to come. If you are looking for something special, why not give him the gift of a unique experience with Wigwam Escape, a nationally award-winning Escape Room that is located at the Institute for American Indian Studies on 38 Curtis Road in Washington Connecticut.

If the dad in your life is a history buff, loves to solve puzzles, and enjoys being challenged while having fun, Wigwam Escape will be an unforgettable bonding experience for the whole family. A highlight of the Wigwam Escape experience is gaining a better understanding of how Native peoples thrived prior to European contact. This is a gift that keeps on giving. After playing the game, you can continue your experience by visiting the museum whose core exhibition follows the 10,000-year-long story of Connecticut’s Native American people, and hiking the Institute trails to a replicated Algonkian Village.

In honor of Father’s Day, the Institute is offering a promotional code that is 20% off the booking and includes gift certificates when using code DAD1518 at checkout. For more information and to book, click here.

Wigwam Escape – The Story

You, the game player, find yourselves in a Native American village in the woodlands of Connecticut in the year 1518. You’ve just received word that an illness is affecting the neighboring fishing village of Metachiwon and they are asking for help. It is seven miles to Metachiwon so you have to act quickly. It’s up to you to figure out how to gather and prepare supplies for your journey ahead. You have one day (roughly one hour of game time) to hunt, gather and cook using only the resources found in the village and surrounding forest. This empathetic experience connects players to the ways Native peoples lived and the skills they relied on 500 years ago in their daily lives.

FAQs – Wigwam Escape

Wigwam Escape allows two to seven players to experience the room. To enhance the experience the room caters only to private groups, so when you book the room, it is for your group only.

The ticket prices are $25 for General Admission, $20 for Students, and $22 for Seniors. Your ticket also includes museum admission to the Institute for American Indian Studies which can be used on the day of your visit.

The suggested age for Wigwam Escape is 12 and up; however, as long as there is a parent or guardian present during the game kids under 12 are welcome.

The suggested age for Wigwam Escape is 12 and up; however, as long as there is a parent or guardian present during the game kids under 12 are welcome.

Wigwam Escape is open Friday, Saturday, and Sunday by reservation. Office hours are Wed. and Thurs. from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. To purchase your tickets, visit www.wigwamescape.org or call (860) 868- 0510.

The Aldrich, Ridgefield Running Company, and On-Running To Host a Run Celebrating 52 Artists

The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum, Ridgefield Running Company, and On-Running are presenting Run
On Art: Run to Celebrate 52 Artists on Thursday, June 16 from 6 to 8 pm. Runners and walkers will complete a 3.1-mile run or 1.5 miles walk around downtown Ridgefield, passing by Ridgefield Running Company where Tharini Pande, RRC Team Member, and artist, has painted the display windows featuring On-Running shoes. The run concludes at The Aldrich where participants are invited to view the exhibition 52 Artists: A Feminist Milestone in the Museum’s galleries and Sculpture Garden and enjoy a celebratory glass of beer, wine, or sparkling water. The entry fee for the run is $12 and all proceeds benefit The Aldrich. Register for the run at www.ridgefieldrunning.com/events.

Participants should know that the On-Running demo shoes will be available for participants to try on a first-come first-served basis. A highlight is watching Tharini Pande paint the display windows at Ridgefield Running Company from June 12 to 16. “Ridgefield Running Company is excited to collaborate with The Aldrich for the 52 Artists exhibition. The ‘5K to celebrate 52,’ is a fun run that passes by RRC’s windows highlighting artwork by our own team member and local resident, Tharini Pande. Both art and running are practices of self-discovery, and we are excited that we are able to combine them with On-Running in this cool community event,” said Megan Searfoss, owner of Ridgefield Running Company.
The Aldrich’s Executive Director Cybele Maylone shared, “The Aldrich is thrilled to partner with Ridgefield Running Company and On-Running on this fun evening that highlights the mind-body connection through running and art.” “At On, we are dedicated to stories telling and igniting the human spirit through movement, nature, design, and sustainability. Partnering with Ridgefield Running Company and The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum is a great way to showcase and champion the artists within our running community,” shared Sam Traux of On-Running.

52 Artists: A Feminist Milestone celebrates the fifty-first anniversary of the historic exhibition Twenty Six Contemporary Women Artists, curated by Lucy R. Lippard and presented at The Aldrich in 1971. 52 Artists will showcase work by the artists included in the original 1971 exhibition, alongside a new roster of twenty-six female-identifying or nonbinary emerging artists, tracking the evolution
of feminist art practices over the past five decades. 52 Artists will encompass the entirety of the Museum—the first exhibition to do so in The Aldrich’s new building which was inaugurated in 2004. The exhibition will be on view at the Museum June 6, 2022, to January 8, 2023.

Run On Art is generously co-sponsored by Ridgefield Running Company and On-Running.

Learn How to Make Traditional Native American Bark Basket Workshop At Institute for American Indian Studies

Native Americans have created baskets for centuries. In fact, archeologists believe that basket-making is one of the oldest known crafts in the world. If you have always wanted to learn how to create a bark basket of your own, join this in-person workshop conducted by Jennifer Lee of Pequot and Narragansett ancestry on Sunday, June 5 at the Institute of American Indian Studies located on 38 Curtis Road in Washington, Connecticut. This four-hour workshop begins at 11 a.m. and has a break for lunch.

Join artist and educator Jennifer of Lee, Narragansett descent

About Native American Baskets

Baskets have been an integral part of Native American material culture for centuries. Native American baskets range from very simple to very elaborate. Often the art of basket making was passed down from generation to generation among Native American Indian mothers to their daughters. It is a skill that takes the place of pride among many Indigenous people today.

Bark baskets made by Eastern Woodland Indians were used for cooking, gathering berries, hauling water, storing food, as cradleboards, and even for burying the dead. Most often baskets were made from pine, ash, or birch bark that was harvested in the spring when the bark was most pliable. The bark was then folded into the desired shape and sewn with spruce root and rimmed with arrowwood or other natural materials.

White Pine Bark mokok with collar (4 ½H x 7W x 3D)

About the Workshop

Jennifer Lee is an 18th-century re-enactor and material culture presenter. Bark basket making is one of the programs that she offers. “I want my programs to dispel old stereotypes and increase awareness of present-day Native Americans,” says Lee.

Participants in this workshop will learn about the lore and tradition of basket making from Lee while creating their very own bark basket. A highlight is learning about how baskets were used in everyday life and their role in Native American communities today. Lee will guide participants through the process of creating a bark basket using white pine bark, spruce root, and willow. During the scheduled lunch break (please bring your own snack and non-alcoholic beverage) participants can wander through the museum for inspiration and brainstorm with others for ideas.

White Pine Bark mokok with collar (7H x 4W x 3D).

Participants can choose from three different basket designs that include a white pine bark wall pocket, and two sizes of a white pine bark mokok with collar. Whatever basket you choose to make, it is something unique to treasure at the end of the day.

Space is limited for this workshop that is expected to sell out, so sign up early. To participate, please register and pre-pay by June 2. The cost of participation, including all materials and tools, is $75 for members of the Institute and $85 for non-members. To register click here. If you have questions call (860) 868-0518 or email events@iaismuseum.org.

White Pine bark wall pocket, curved bottom (7H x 7W x 4D)

About the Institute for American Indian Studies

Located on 15 acres of woodland acres the Institute For American Indian Studies preserves and educates through archeology, research, exhibitions, and programs. They have a 16th c. Algonquian Village, Award-Winning Wigwam Escape, and a museum with temporary and permanent displays of authentic artifacts from prehistory to the present that allows visitors to foster a new understanding of the world and the history and culture of Native Americans. The Institute for American Indian Studies is located on 38 Curtis Road, Washington, CT.

Docktails & Oysters @ Norwalk’s Norm Bloom & Sons A Special Event Hosted by the Seaport Association

Who doesn’t enjoy hors d’ouves, cocktails, and oysters on the dock? It is a veritable summer tradition in Norwalk and one that the Seaport Association has embraced. Back by popular demand, Docktails & Oysters is the Seaport Association’s signature event on the dock at Norm Bloom and Son, a fourth-generation oyster farm in Norwalk. This seaside, fun-filled event for gourmands is taking place on Saturday, June 4, 2022, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.

This Luau-inspired party will get you in an “aloha state of mind” as you see folks in brightly colored Hawaiian shirts, listening to live beach music, sipping cocktails, and slurping the freshest oysters you will ever taste! “It’s a chance for folks to get to know what the Seaport Association does, have a little fun, and experience an authentic oyster farm,” said Mike Reilly, President of the Seaport Association.

If you have never had oysters, literally fresh off the boat this is an unforgettable opportunity to eat your fill of them – our advice is to come hungry! It’s fun to watch the pros shuck the oysters before your eyes (they make it look so easy) and set them on trays with lemons and an assortment of sauces. In addition to the unlimited clam and oyster bar, this Luau-themed event also offers passed and tabled appetizers such as citrus grilled shrimp, house-smoked pork sliders, and blackened swordfish tacos with pineapple salsa, vegetable spring rolls, and black bean and corn salad, in keeping with the island vibe.

An added bonus is the opportunity to explore the dock at Norm Bloom Oysters and Son, one of the few remaining traditional oyster farms in the United States to learn how oysters are grown and harvested. The oysters are incubated under the dock and, when they are big enough, they are “planted” on the sandy bottom of the Sound that surrounds you. The result of this time-consuming and meticulous process is some of the best oysters you will ever taste. Norwalk oysters are prized worldwide and known for their sweet briny flavor and plump meats.

Tickets to this event are limited and are $75 online and $85 @ the door. For more information and to get your tickets http://www.seaport.org, if you have questions, call 203-838-9444.

About the Norwalk Seaport Association

The Norwalk Seaport Association was founded in 1978 by a group of local citizens who had the vision to revitalize South Norwalk and preserve Norwalk’s maritime heritage. The Seaport Association offers a cultural, environmental, and historical journey to the Norwalk Islands. The Sheffield Island Lighthouse and the Light Keeper’s Cottage provide a unique historical and educational venue that strives to increase awareness, appreciation, and consideration for the environment and how the preservation of historic buildings contributes to our quality of life. The combination of the Lighthouse and the Stewart B. McKinney National Wildlife Refuge offers an unparalleled opportunity to educate children of all ages and adults about the importance of preserving Long Island Sound, our environment, and our maritime heritage.

Norwalk’s Sheffield Island Gets Ready For Summer 2022

Sheffield Island Lighthouse located off the coast of Norwalk has been renovated and maintained by the volunteers of the Seaport Association since 1978 so that summer visitors taking the Association’s ferry to the island can enjoy its’ unspoiled natural beauty. The outing to Sheffield Island is one of the most popular activities in Connecticut, not only because of the thrill of being out on the water but also for the chance to tour a historic lighthouse on the National Register and, explore a private island.

Expect a warm welcome on Sheffield Island

Seeing how beautifully maintained the island is, it begs the question, what goes into opening Sheffield Island for the season? The short answer is a lot! Linda Cappello, a long-time Trustee on the Executive Board has taken on the task of putting together a team of volunteers that get Sheffield Island ready for summer guests that take the Seaport’s ferry to it. “The first thing I do is visit the island prior to putting together a work party to see how the island and lighthouse have weathered the winter. I have to access if there are any particular concerns that need to be addressed in addition to the routine tasks that have to be accomplished each year before we open,” Cappello said. “I inspect the interior and exterior of the lighthouse and grounds to determine what tasks need immediate attention, as well as those that require eventual attention.”

On the initial trip to the Island, the work party spends about five hours cleaning the place up. Tasks like cutting up fallen limbs, painting picnic tables, cutting down all seagrass, and weeding the pathways are just some of the many things to do. Lighthouse tasks are a bit more challenging. All the windows, that were boarded up have to be uncovered, the gutters and downspouts have to be cleaned and checked for damage, the tower has to be checked, the lighthouse rooms have to be cleaned, and the furniture and displays polished and set -up for the season. The work party, consisting of 20 to 25 volunteers will go out to the island several times before Memorial Day Weekend in order to make sure everything is in tip-top shape.

Cleaning up the Brick Memorial Walkway in Front of the Lighthouse

When asked, why she organizes this seasonal pilgrimage, Cappello says, “It is my passion. I have cruised the waters of Long Island Sound and the Norwalk Islands for as long as I can remember. My father introduced me to the Sound when I was a child, and I have loved it ever since! If I could live on the Island I would! As for our volunteers, and we always welcome the help, just contact us. I think it offers them a unique opportunity for a good cause, especially if they have a love for Norwalk’s maritime history and Long Island Sound,” Cappello concluded. The work of course doesn’t end there. Throughout the summer season, the lighthouse has to be cleaned, the grass has to be mowed, and the shells along the pathways have to be maintained, along with a myriad of other tasks to keep Sheffield Island and Lighthouse welcoming for visitors.

This year, the Seaport Association is offering a sunset cruise on Thursday, May 26, Friday, May 27, Saturday, May 28, and Sunday, May 29 from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. A cruise to Sheffield Island is scheduled for Saturday, May 28, and Sunday, May 29 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. Special bird cruises departing at 8 a.m. are scheduled for Sunday, May 15, and Saturday, May 28 and Sunday, May 29. Beginning in June sunset cruises will run from Wednesday to Sunday and three-hour cruises to Sheffield Island and Lighthouse will run on Saturday and Sunday. Starting June 28, cruises to Sheffield Island will run twice a day, Tuesday – Sunday at 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. The vessel does not offer cruises on Mondays. For tickets and more information http://seaport.org.

Passengers are asked to arrive 30 minutes prior to departure. The vessel leaves from the Seaport Dock on 4 North Water Street in Norwalk. The dock is adjacent to the Stroffolino Bridge at the corner of Washington and Water Streets in South Norwalk. Parking is available at the adjacent lot or at the Maritime Center Parking Garage across the street from the dock. Tickets are available online in advance by clicking here.

Getting ready to welcome summer visitors

About the Norwalk Seaport Association
The Norwalk Seaport Association was founded in 1978 by a group of local citizens who had the vision to revitalize South Norwalk and preserve Norwalk’s maritime heritage. The Seaport Association offers a cultural, environmental, and historical journey to the Norwalk Islands. The Sheffield Island Lighthouse and the Light Keeper’s Cottage provide a unique historical and educational venue that strives to increase awareness, appreciation, and consideration for the environment and how the preservation of historic buildings contributes to our quality of life. The combination of the Lighthouse and the Stewart B. McKinney National Wildlife Refuge offers an unparalleled opportunity to educate children of all ages and adults about the importance of preserving Long Island Sound, our environment, and our maritime heritage.

Tea Party @ Woodbury’s Historic Glebe House Museum June 15

The May Tea High Tea at the Glebe House Museum and Gertrude Jeykll Garden on Hollow Road in Woodbury is perfect for gourmands that enjoy delicious goodies, a spot of tea in a beautiful garden, or inside this wonderfully preserved historic house museum that dates to the 1600s. The May Tea @ The Glebe House is a high-style afternoon tea on Sunday, May 15 (with a rain date of May 22) from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m.

In order to make everyone comfortable, guests have an option of where they want to sit. It is not an easy choice. Guests can choose between sitting in the fresh air in the famous Jeykll Garden, the only one in existence in the United States, or in one of the most historic and authentically appointed house museums in New England. Harney and Sons Teas will be served with a fine haberdashery of delightful bites, sweets, sandwiches, and other goodies.

In the 19th-century drinking tea was only enjoyed by the upper echelons of society. High tea originated in 1840 with the Duchess of Bedford that shared her guilty pleasure of enjoying tea and snacks a few hours before dinner, with a friend, that told a friend, setting a trend that would evolve to become a national tradition in the United Kingdom.

Today, of course, tea can be enjoyed by everyone, but high tea is something special, perhaps a nod to when things were not so complicated. The afternoon tea party has been a spring signature event of the Glebe House for several years and has grown in popularity every year. This particular event is especially meaningful at the Glebe House because it relates to its connection to British horticulture and church history.

Advanced tickets and registration is required. Tickets are $35 per person and can be purchased here. All proceeds go to the maintenance and restoration of this historic Connecticut gem.