The Old Store is Opening In Sherman

The Sherman Historical Society has just announced the re-opening of The Old Store located in the heart of the bucolic town of Sherman on Rte. 37. Beginning May 28 The Old Store will be open on Fridays and Saturdays from 12 noon to 4 p.m. In light of the pandemic, the Historical Society has added air filtration machines as well as a touchless hand sanitizer station and sneeze guards at the counter. Staff will continue to wear masks and asks that customers do as well out of an abundance of caution.

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The Old Store and Gift Shop is filled to the brim with all manner of goodies to purchase. It is owned by the Sherman Historical Society and all proceeds support the maintenance and improvement to the building. The Old Store is located in a mercantile that once belonged to David Northrop Jr. and dates to 1829. This store-museum gives visitors a chance to reminisce on how the old Mercantile sold items for every need imaginable. A second floor gallery has rotating historical exhibitions and art shows. Items of special interest include several wonderful books about the history and homes of this fascinating community.

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Save the date for the popular Barn Sale that is taking place this year on August 13 – 15. This three day sale offers a fascinating selection of antiques, collectibles, furniture, books, dishes, china, household items, children’s toys and much more.

For more information on the Sherman Historical Society click here.

“Divided Light and Color: American Impressionist Landscapes” AT The Bruce Museum Through Jan. 29

Still among the best loved of all artistic movements, Impressionism records the world with a memorable alacrity, capturing scenes with spontaneous shorthand of divided light and color. The Bruce Museum in Greenwich, Connecticut, presents a new exhibition, “Divided Light and Color: American Impressionist Landscapes” that runs through January 29, 2012.
One of the greatest strengths of the Bruce Museum’s permanent collection and local private collectors’ interests is the American Impressionist landscape. This exhibition brings together two dozen fine examples of impressionist art in a show with imagery that continues to enchant and endure.

Recent acquisitions by The Bruce Museum include examples of the some of the pioneers of American Impressionism, including the distinguished painters, Theodore Robinson (1852-1896), John Henry Twachtman (1853-1902), and Childe Hassam (1859-1935).
Childe Hassam is well represented locally, with outstanding masterpieces recording his time in France and summer art excursions in New England. He is also well known for his work of the local Greenwich scene, including the Holley House, site of the famous Cos Cob Art Colony, as well as Mill Pond and railway bridge in Cos Cob.

The exhibition attests to the importance of the local Cos Cob Art Colony and its founders and instructors, such as Leonard Ochtman (1854-1934), whose house overlooked the Mianus River and whose work is extensively represented at the Bruce Museum. Second generation American Impressionists, such as Elmer Livingston MacRae (1875-1953), Founder of the America Pastel Society and the Greenwich Society of Artists is also represented. A highlight is the work of Matilda Browne (1869-1947), a local resident of Greenwich, and one of the few women artists among the early American Impressionists.


The exponents of American Impressionist landscape painting also recorded American scenery as far afield as New Hope, Pennsylvania and Carmel, California. Uniting these diverse works is a response to changes in light, a strong palette, and the carefully observed atmospheric effects so characteristic of American Impressionism.

This is a beautiful show that should not be missed by lovers of Impressionist Art.

About the Bruce Museum
Consistently voted the “Best Museum” by area media, the Bruce Museum is a regionally based, world-class institution highlighting art, science and natural history in more than a dozen changing exhibitions annually. The Bruce Museum is located at 1 Museum Drive in Greenwich, Connecticut, USA. General admission is $7 for adults, $6 for seniors and students, and free for children under five and Bruce Museum members. Free admission to all on Tuesdays. The Museum is located near Interstate-95, Exit 3, and a short walk from the Greenwich, CT, train station. Museum hours are: Tuesday through Saturday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Sunday 1 p.m. to 5 p.m., and closed Mondays and major holidays. Museum exhibition tours are held Fridays at 12:30 p.m. Free, on-site parking is available. For information, call the Bruce Museum at (203) 869-0376, or visit the Bruce Museum website at www.brucemuseum.org.

Fall Impressionist Painting Workshop at Weir Farm Wilton CT

There has been a tradition of Impressionist painting at Weir Farm National Historic Site since Julian Alden Weir, the father of American Impressionism, acquired this rural, rustic retreat in Branchville, Connecticut in 1882.

To honor as well as to continue this tradition, Weir Farm National Historic Site will be offering a two-day Fall Impressionist Painting Workshop on Saturday and Sunday October 1 and 2 from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. This workshop is designed for intermediate and advanced art students and artists interested in learning more about the science and poetry of Impressionist landscape painting.

Participants must have a basic understanding of their selected art form and be able to handle their own equipment for plein air fieldwork as well as for the studio workshop environment.

Workshops will include introductory classroom lectures, field demonstrations, and critique of the participant’s artwork. Registration for this workshop is free, but space is limited to twelve artists, so please call early to secure a spot!

First choice will be given to artists who have not participated in a previous Impressionist Painting Workshop at Weir Farm National Historic Site. However, for those artists who wish to return, names will be placed on a wait-list and be considered as space allows.


To register or for more information, please call (203) 834-1896 ext.10. This workshop is just one in a series that will be offered at Weir Farm National Historic Site.

The How to be an Impressionist Painter Workshop Series will be taught by Impressionist artist and educator Dmitri Wright, of Greenwich, Connecticut. Mr. Wright seeks to continue the Impressionist discipline through his preservation and progress of American Impressionism as the artist-in-residence of the Historical Society of the Town of Greenwich and as an instructor of Impressionist drawing and painting at the Greenwich Art Society, Silvermine School of Art, and Weir Farm National Historic Site.

Visitors to Weir Farm National Historic Site are always invited to set up their easels and paint this unspoiled landscape that has inspired impressionists for years.

About Weir Farm

Weir Farm National Historic Site was home to three generations of American artists. Julian Alden Weir, a leading figure in American art and the development of American Impressionism, acquired the farm in 1882. After Weir, the artistic legacy was continued by his daughter, painter Dorothy Weir Young and her husband, sculptor Mahonri Young, followed by New England painters Sperry and Doris Andrews. Today, the 60-acre farm, which includes the Weir House, Weir and Young Studios, barns, gardens, and Weir Pond, is one of the nation’s finest remaining landscapes of American art. For more information about Weir Farm National Historic Site or the National Park Service, please visit http://www.nps.gov/wefa or call (203) 834-1896.

New Exhibition at the Center for Contemporary Printmaking Sept. 18- Nov. 13

The new exhibition, featuring artist Jack Boul, at The Center for Contemporary Printmaking (CCP) opens on Sunday, September 18 at 2 pm, and is on view through Sunday, November 13, 2011. This exhibition is a northeast premiere, for an accomplished artist and educator whose idyllic landscapes and scenes of everyday life at home and abroad are well known in the Washington DC area.

On view are over 150 works representing subject matter that has concerned and inspired this artist for decades. His signature cows and dancers appear throughout the Grace Ross Shanley Gallery at CCP, sometimes as printmaker’s monotypes, again as painter’s oils on board, and yet again as sculptor’s bronzes.

At the heart of the exhibition are Jack Boul’s monotypes, depicting dancers and cityscapes, cows and graineries, guitarists, musicians, and wait staff. “For this artist, there is no perceived hierarchy in his studio, where his two etching presses are a few feet away from his easel, always at the ready”, writes Anthony Kirk, curator of the exhibition. At CCP, Artistic Director and Master Printer Anthony Kirk helped the artist translate a number of his monotypes into photopolymer intaglio plates. Several recent editions made from these plates are included in the exhibition.

Jack Boul was born in Brooklyn, in 1927, the son of a Russian émigré father and a Romanian mother. Boul first studied art at the American Artist’s School, and then he studied at the Cornish School of Art, on the GI Bill. He moved to Washington DC, and continued his art studies at American University, where he eventually joined the art faculty, and was a distinguished professor for 15 years. In 1984, Boul was a founding faculty member of the new Washington Studio School, where he taught painting, drawing and monotype for ten years before retiring in 1994, to devote his full time to printmaking and painting. His first museum exhibition was held at the Baltimore Museum of Art, in 1994. The Corcoran Gallery of Art held a career retrospective for the artist, in 2000. The National Gallery of Art and the Metropolitan Museum of Art own impressions of his monotypes.

Exhibition-related Events

The Center for Contemporary Printmaking (CCP) is conducting a writing competition, based on the “soulful” works of Jack Boul, in collaboration with Ina Chadwick’s MouseMuse Productions, an arts partnering company located in Westport, CT. Entry deadline for the competition, named “Déjà Vu”, is September 23, 2011 at 5 pm. The winning works will be read by professional actors at a CCP festive awards ceremony and reception, on Sunday, November 13, 2011, at 4 pm. For more information, visit http://www.contemprints.org/writers.

Reception

The public is invited to the opening reception for the new exhibition, Jack Boul: Intimate Scale: Paintings, Sculptures, Monotypes Sunday, September 18, from 2 – 5 pm, at the Center for Contemporary Printmaking. Rumor has it that Jack Boul and his son, David, may be in attendance. Refreshments will be served. Admission is free.

The Center for Contemporary Printmaking

Normal hours are Monday through Saturday 9 am to 5 pm, and Sunday, 12 to 5 pm. The gallery is located at 299 West Ave., in Mathews Park, Norwalk, CT., 203-899-7999, http://www.contemprints.org. Admission is free, and the gallery is handicapped accessible.

New Canaan Nature Center Art Exhibit The Little Things by Melissa Kircher

A exhibit of original paintings and photography by Melissa Kircher will be on display at the New Canaan Nature Center through June 14. The exhibit, entitled “The Little Things,” is a series of floral and nature inspired photographs that combine elements of color, light, and texture, both man-made and natural. Kiircher says “I find the often overlooked aspects of nature appealing, taking joy in spotting a hidden flower, leaf, or an unusual scene. These works are about discovering the beauty in little things.”

The photographs have all been processed with different fine art elements to create unique and truly original works of art. Melissa Kircher attended Gordon College in Massachusetts where she studied drawing, printmaking, graphic design, and sculpture. She earned a BFA in Visual Arts with a concentration in sculpture. Melissa is currently a self employed artist in the fields of painting, photography, photo-processing, graphic design and freelance writing. Her home and studio is in Norwalk, Connecticut and her work has been displayed in various Connecticut, Massachusetts, and New York City locations. Melissa’s artwork can be seen on her web-site: http://www.melissakircher.com.

For more information please call 966-9577. A portion of proceeds from the sale of the artwork will benefit the New Canaan Nature Center

The New Canaan Nature Center is an environmental education center and sanctuary dedicated to helping people of all ages better understand, appreciate and care for the world of nature. The Nature Center’s grounds, which include a Birds of Prey exhibit and gardens, are open from dawn to dusk daily. The Visitor’s Center and Discovery Room are open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Saturday.

New Show at GREGORY JAMES GALLERY in Litchfield Hills CT

The Gregory James Gallery, located at 13 Main Street on New Milford’s historic green, announces its first show of the new season. The show opens Saturday, April 30, and runs through May 29, 2011.

The public is invited to an opening reception, Saturday, April 30, 5-7 pm. The group show will feature prominent regional artists including; Joel Spector, Bill Rice, Thomas Adkins, Christopher Magadini, Alain Picard, Scott Zuckerman, Julie Hopkins, James Coe, and Frank Federico.

Joel Spector was chosen as one of 20 finalists out of 1750 entries in the 2011 International Portrait Competition hosted by the Portrait Society of America. The Woodson Art Museum has named James Coe as its 2011 Master Artist who will be honored during the Museum’s 36th annual Birds in Art exhibition this fall. Frank Federico and Christopher Magadini will be featured in one-man shows later in the year.

The gallery hours are Monday through Saturday 10-5, Sunday 11-4. For more information, please call Gregory James Mullen at 860-354-3436, or visit the website: http://www.gregoryjamesgallery.com.