An Ecology Walk Along the Shepaug River With the Institute for American Indian Studies

A summer walk along the Shepaug River that runs through Washington is a rewarding experience, especially when guided by IAIS Educator and Ecologist, Susan Scherf on Saturday, July 9 at 10 a.m. The cost of this program hosted by the Institute for American Indian Studies on 38 Curtis Road in Washington Connecticut is $10 for adults, $8 for seniors, $6 for children, and $5 for members. This hike is perfect for nature lovers and will have them looking at the natural world in a new and exciting way.

Fun on the Shepaug

The Shepaug River whose Native American name means “rocky waters” has a long history of habitation. Native Americans have lived overlooking this river for thousands of years. Many stone tools and items such as bone needles and punches, wooden spear shafts, tool handles, and much more have been found in archeological excavations along the banks of the Shepaug.

Rivers are considered the lifeline of ecosystems around the world. On this guided walk participants will learn that Native peoples traditionally recognized that all beings are interconnected. An important life lesson of this walk is to realize that we can learn about our environment by observing wildlife, plants, trees, and flowers. Summer is one of the best times to observe wildlife along the Shepaug from watching a great blue heron hunt to listening to frogs croaking, and feeling the exoskeleton of a crayfish. Walking along this babbling river Susan will discuss animal adaptations and explain what to look and listen for when trying to identify different species in the Eastern Woodland environment.

Participants should wear sturdy hiking or walking shoes, and be prepared to walk about a mile along the river with frequent stops along the way. Participants are encouraged to bring water and extra shoes or sandals to change into down by the river. Space on this hike is limited and pre-registration is required. To reserve your space visit http://www.iaismuseum.org to reserve a space through Eventbrite. If you have questions, call 860-868-0518 or email events@iaismuseum.org.

Bradley Airport New Transportation Center

Today, the Connecticut Airport Authority celebrated the anticipated opening of its Ground Transportation Center at Bradley International Airport with a ribbon-cutting ceremony. The new $210 million state-of-the-art facility is on track to open to the public in mid-July.

The key elements of the new Ground Transportation Center include:

Convenient Rental Car Services
The rental car operations for nine brands will be consolidated under one roof in this facility, including vehicle pick-up and drop-off, car storage, cleaning, and fueling. Passenger access is available within a short and sheltered walking distance from the main terminal, Terminal A. Passengers will no longer need to use a shuttle to access their rental cars.

Additional Public Parking
The facility will add 830 new public parking spots, increasing the airport’s parking availability by ten percent. More than half of those spaces will offer covered parking, and the remainder will be surface parking spots next to the facility. All new spots are within a short walking distance to Terminal A.

Improved Access to Public Transportation
In addition to housing charter bus traffic, the facility will also include a dedicated area that, in the future, will be used to receive high-frequency buses connecting the airport to the CTRail line, as well as regional bus services.

Honoring Juneteenth @ the Glebe House

The Glebe House on Hollow Road in Woodbury is hosting readings from “A Narrative of the Life and Adventures of Venture, a Native of Africa: But Resident above Sixty Years in the United States of America.” Guest speaker, Dr. James Bauer of Woodbury, will read his chosen passages from Venture’s Narrative.

Venture was born in West Africa (c1729), sold into slavery and brought to New England by way of Barbados, Venture Smith was able to buy his freedom and that of his family. He was successful in many of his business endeavors and purchased a farm in 1775 at Haddam Neck in Connecticut. In 1798, Venture dictated his life and experiences which were printed by The Bee in New London, Connecticut, making his story the earliest published slave narrative in the United States.

A warm awaits @ the Glebe House

Dr. Bauer is a supporter of many local groups such as Connecticut Choral Society, Woodbury Baseball and Softball, Woodbury Pop Warner, and Nonnewaug HS Grad night, to name just a few. He is also a member of the Tufts Alumni Advancement Program. He is affiliated with the Danbury Dental Association, and a member of the Connecticut Dental Association, American Dental Association as well as the Missions of Mercy Dental service.

Lacrosse – More Than Just A Game New Exhibition @ Institute for American Indian Studies

Lacrosse was originally played by eastern Native Americans and Canada’s First People. The Institute for American Indian Studies located at 38 Curtis Road in Washington Connecticut has just opened a fascinating special exhibition, “More Than a Game: The Story of Lacrosse,” that will be on view at the Institute through August 2022.

This well-researched exhibition touches on a variety of subjects, many of which are unexpected in light of the game many of us know today. Some of the most interesting aspects of the exhibition relate to the spiritual importance of lacrosse and how it connects to creation stories, the way they settle differences, and its continued social and communal significance.

This exhibition also explores the appropriation of lacrosse by Euro-Americans and Canadians. In the 1860’s Dr. George Beers of Canada wrote the first standardized rulebook for lacrosse in an attempt to “civilize” the game. By the 1890s, Native American communities were banned from participating in national competitions. This part of the exhibition includes documentation in the form of newspaper clippings and images that depict the history of lacrosse in popular culture and how it was interpreted.

More Than a Game also highlights how traditional lacrosse sticks evolved in North America. Several lacrosse sticks on display showcase the three major styles of Native American lacrosse and demonstrate the different regional interpretations of the game.

This exhibit touches on the relationship between lacrosse and Native communities today. It delves into the saga of the Iroquois Nationals, the only Native American athletic team
permitted to compete in international competitions. Don’t miss the exhibition’s video that shows Native Americans making wooden sticks in the traditional way and relating why it is important to the future of their culture. This exhibit can be summed up by a quote by Rex Lyons, Onondaga, “Lacrosse is part of the story of our creation, of our identity, of who we are. So when we play the game, we always say that there’s a simultaneous game going on in the Sky World and our ancestors are playing with us.”

The Institute for American Indian Studies is open Wednesday – Sunday 11 a.m. – 4 p.m. and admission is $12 for adults, $8 for children 3-12, $10 for seniors, and members are free.

About Institute for American Indian Studies
Located on 15 acres of woodland acres the Institute For American Indian Studies preserves and educates through archeology, research, exhibitions, and programs. They have the 16th c. Algonquian Village, Award-Winning Wigwam Escape, and a museum with temporary and permanent displays of authentic artifacts from prehistory to the present that allows visitors to foster a new understanding of the world and the history and culture of Native Americans. The Institute for American Indian Studies is located on 38 Curtis Road, Washington, CT.

Summer Fun @ Glebe House in Woodbury

Thanks to Ion Bank Foundation and the Gabrielson Family Fund children may enjoy three weeks of unique summer experiences, filled with fun and hands-on learning at our 18th-century historic site, The Glebe House Museum and Gertrude Jekyll Garden. This year the programs will span Colonial and Victorian life in Woodbury where children will experience innovative, exciting, enriching, and fun activities, and are limited to only 12 in a group.



Registration is open for all sessions:

“Hands-on History” July 11 – 15 offers children ages 6-12 experiences in 18th-century life. Children participate in activities spanning quill writing, candle making, historic house tours, colonial games, and much more.

New this year is “Jekyll’s Secret Garden” from July 18 through July 22 for children ages 6-12. This program gives children the opportunity to explore “The Secret Garden” story by Frances Hodgson Burnett and learn scenes from the play of the same name by Marsha Norman. Guest artist, Carol Ziske, will lead this program. Ms. Ziske is an Actor and Director who has numerous plays, films, and vocal recordings. As an Actor, she has starred in more than 15 plays and motion pictures, such as “Fiddler on the Roof” and “Other People’s Money”. As a Director she has produced more than 15 plays including Our Town (Warner Theater-Torrington) and Love Letters (Newport, RI), just to name a few. Ms. Ziske has extensive experience sharing her love of theater with children and has been an acting teacher and coach for many years. The program will also include gardening activities & crafts.

Another popular program is “Individual Program Days for the Young Apprentice” for children ages 10-15, which will be held July 25 – 28 with each day exploring a different colonial craft. The schedule includes Colonial Lighting & Tin Lanterns, Colonial Cooking, Textiles & Weaving, and Basket Making.

A popular program also being offered this summer is Hands-on History & Art of the Garden which runs Monday – Friday from 9:00 am – 3:00 pm. The cost to participate is $225 for Members and $250 for Non-Members per week.

Individual Program Days are offered Monday – Thursday from 9:00 am-1:00 pm at $40 for Members and $45 for Non-Members per program day.

Please see website for details and registration form: http://www.glebehousemuseum.org Registrations will be accepted until all programs are filled.

High School Students aged 14 and up are encouraged to apply as “Youth Leaders” to earn community service hours and a small stipend as they help staff with daily activities for the program.

College Students and Adults aged 18 and up who have an interest in history, gardening, theater and education are encouraged to apply as paid Program Leaders for individual weeks.

Please call The Glebe House Museum at 203-263-2855, email us at office@glebehousemuseum.org, or visit us online at glebehousemuseum.org to register, to receive a program brochure or for additional information.

This June Enjoy the Beauty of Birds on Long Island Sound with the Seaport Association

Bird Cruises are one of the most popular excursions operated by the Seaport Association in Norwalk. Although Connecticut is a small state, it is rich in birdlife with more than 430 different bird species to spot. If you are a veteran or novice birding enthusiast and want to add seabirds to your list, hop on board the C.J. Toth, a 49- passenger vessel with the Seaport Association on Saturday, June 11 and Sunday, June 12, and Saturday, June 25, and Sunday, June 26 from 8 am to 10:30 a.m. for the June Bird Cruises that welcomes adults as well as children.

An avian adventure on Long Island Sound in June provides a unique opportunity to see birds in their natural habitat. Every cruise is different because you never know what will fly your way, making this excursion an adventure in itself. The bird cruise in June offers different things to see than the bird cruises offered in May. June is the month when many birds breed making it the perfect time to look for birds where they nest. On this guided tour escorted by Will Schneck, a member of the esteemed Connecticut Young Birders Club, passengers will learn about local bird behavior and biology and, most importantly how to spot them. “One thing that we will be looking for is birds that are nesting, raising their families, resting, and feeding,” says Schneck. Among the types of birds, you may see on this eco-adventure cruise are nest sites and nest colonies of ospreys, and long-legged egrets with their graceful S-curved necks and long dagger-like bills, as well as playful American oystercatchers, herons, terns, gulls, and cormorants to name a few.

Another special feature of this cruise is the chance to spot birds at the Stewart B. McKinney National Wildlife Refuge on Sheffield Island. Here you will see a variety of habitats that support nesting and wading birds. This spot is known for its small population of herring and great black-backed gulls that nest along Sheffield Island’s rocky shoreline. The importance of the Norwalk Islands to wildlife, especially migratory birds is enormous, and the special Bird Cruises hosted by the Norwalk Seaport Association give nature enthusiasts, adults, and children alike, the chance to spot these magnificent seabirds up close with the added benefit of a knowledgeable guide.

Bird Cruise Details
Passengers are asked to arrive 30 minutes prior to the 8 a.m. departure. The vessel leaves from the Seaport Dock that is adjacent to the Stroffolino Bridge at the corner of Washington and Water Streets in South Norwalk. Parking is available at the adjacent lot or at the Norwalk Parking Garage. Tickets are available online in advance by clicking here and are $25 in addition to a small ticketing fee. The Seaport Association advises reserving your Bird Cruise early because these popular excursions sell out. Make sure you include your email when reserving your ticket. If the tour is canceled due to inclement weather the Norwalk Seaport Association will contact you via your email.

Before embarking on this cruise, be sure to pack sunscreen, your camera, binoculars, water and snacks, and your sense of adventure!

About the Norwalk Seaport Association

The Norwalk Seaport Association was founded in 1978 by a group of local citizens who had the vision to revitalize South Norwalk and preserve Norwalk’s maritime heritage. The Seaport Association offers a cultural, environmental, and historical journey to the Norwalk Islands. The Sheffield Island Lighthouse and the Light Keeper’s Cottage provide a unique historical and educational venue that strives to increase awareness, appreciation, and consideration for the environment and how the preservation of historic buildings contributes to our quality of life. The combination of the Lighthouse and the Stewart B. McKinney National Wildlife Refuge offers an unparalleled opportunity to educate children of all ages and adults about the importance of preserving Long Island Sound, our environment, and our maritime heritage.